All posts by Mike Zonta

“Quantum Physics: Sensing Unbroken Wholeness” by Judith Bluestone Polich

Excerpt from Return of the Children of Light, Incan and Mayan
Prophecies for a New World

COMMENT: In this intriguing look at quantum physics and the nature of the physical world the author explores the break-through concepts of modern science that support the ancient beliefs put forth by eastern and indigenous teachings that we live in a world of illusion.   The physical world in fact is both particle and wave and is unified in one interacting whole.  The concept that we are “light beings” takes on a clearer meaning through this revelation.

Sensing Unbroken Wholeness

We may then consider every cell in the human body as a library of information. Each cell is made of molecules, each molecule is made of atoms, and atoms are made of electrons, neutrons, and protons. In connection with Einstein’s familiar formula, E=mc2, we have been taught that matter and energy are equivalent, that we can convert energy into matter, and that the energy in a piece of matter is equal to the mass of the matter times the speed of light squared. Thus, even minute amounts of matter represent a lot of energy However, while in the past it was believed that electrons were particles-matter existing at some point in space-now, according to particle physics, electrons are not particles all of the time, but sometimes behave like waves of lightThe current consensus is that they are both wave-like and particle-like, as is all matter. In fact, in the world of quantum physics, it seems these elementary “particles” (including electrons) don’t really exist at all. What does exist are relationships, correlations, tendencies to actualize from a multifaceted set of potentials. A quantum physicist might say that electrons, like all other subatomic particles, are described by a “probability density state.” At this level it is strikingly evident that there may be no objective physical reality at all. What the scientific community once thought was there in the sub-atomic realm and what the educated world was taught to perceive as real simply does not exist.

The new physics tells us that matter may actually be nothing more than a series of patterns out of focus and that subatomic “particles” aren’t really made of energy, but simply are energy! The subatomic world of electrons, protons, and neutrons may thus be viewed as patterns of vibration within what Rupert Sheidrake calls a morphogenetic field, an organizing field that underlies a system’s structure.

We know we can convert matter into energy. We can burn wood and get heat. We can mathematically determine how much heat we would get from a pile of wood by using Einstein’s formula. And the reverse is also true; energy can be converted into matter. For example, high-energy laser light can be observed to produce particle and anti-particle pairs. Cosmic rays, which are highly charged photons of light, have been observed to change form and become matter. Light, X-rays, and radio waves can all be converted back to particles. When their waves are slowed down they attain mass while retaining some wave-like characteristics.

Light also can either be considered a wave or a stream of particles. We know that photons carry energy, and that the amount of energy carried by a photon is proportional to the frequency of the light. That is, the higher the wave frequency, the more energy it carries. For example, X-rays and ultraviolet light have high frequency and high energy, while radio waves and infrared waves have low frequency and low energy.

Just as surprising as the apparent ethereal qualities of matter is the fact that it is the observer who brings the possibilities of the micro-world into existence. In experiment after experiment, it has been shown that when the observed function, the wave, interacts with the observing system, the person making the measurement, it changes to a new state. And whether what comes into actuality is a wave or a particle depends solely on the structure of the experiment. One interesting aspect of the apparent dual representative state of matter is that it is not a dual property of the particle, but rather a property of experimental observations. Niels Bohr, who is regarded as the father of quantum physics, pointed out that a particle only becomes a particle when someone is looking at it. The new physics tells us that the observer cannot observe anything without changing what he sees. Moreover, Princeton researchers Brenda I. Dunne and Robert G. Jahn have shown that this concept is not limited to the microworld of quantum interactions. Astonishingly, they have, through a series of well documented experiments, established that our minds, our intent, can alter the outcome of events.

The implications of these findings are far reaching and significant for the world of everyday activity and human interaction. They imply that by our conscious intent we bring into manifestation what we want to perceive-that we can and do shape our reality.

In addition, according to new scientific thought, all matter and we our-selves consist of forms of light. In his book Vibrational Medicine, physician Richard Gerber actually describes all matter as “frozen light,” light which has been slowed down and become solid. A quantum physicist would say that light in this context does not slow down-it always moves at the speed of light. Rather the light’s photons get absorbed; its energy has been transferred. Gerber points out that atoms are primarily empty space. What fills them, he says, are packets of light that sometimes act as matter.

If our bodies, at least metaphorically, are made of frozen light, they maintain the characteristics of light, which means they have frequency. Matter then may be thought of as light of a higher density. Thus, drawing on the implications of modern physics, we can conclude that human beings are made of light held in matter.

It is important to stress that Gerber’s concept of matter as frozen light may not be merely metaphoric. Gerber describes the cellular matrix of the physical body as a complex energy interference pattern, interpenetrated by the organizing bio energetic field of the etheric body. The physical body is therefore an energy field, and the field is made up of segments of vibration. As physicist Max Planck determined, higher frequency light means higher energy light. This concept also applies to what we think of as matter because we now know that all matter, not just quantum matter, also has frequency and thus waves-another scientific revelation that has radically changed the way we see the physical world. Using simple equations, Louis De Broglie discovered the wavelengths of waves that correspond to matter, which are not visible to us. Breakthroughs in quantum physics imply that all matter, including matter that makes up the human body, is itself made up of waves of light. It is therefore interesting to note that many ancient teachings saw humans as engendered by light, as children of light.

The Nobel Prize winning physicist David Bohm has written about what he calls the implicate order of the holographic universe. This concept suggests that the entire universe is an ever-changing cosmic hologram that is layered with information. Each layer holds a higher order of information and each higher order is enfolded in an aspect of space/time. The higher order may be thought of as consciousness that filters wave-like into form. Because it is a hologram, every segment contains information about the entire universe. Thus, consciousness is indeed in all things. Light is both the medium and the message.

Moreover, Bohm’s work in quantum physics suggests that at the subatomic level all points in space are essentially the same, and therefore nothing is actually separate from anything else. This property is called non-locality. Bell’s Theorem, developed a few years later by J. S. Bell, a Swiss physicist, provided mathematical proof of non-locality.’If we think about locality in terms of the particle behavior of light (a specific point in space), then non-locality can be seen in terms of light behaving as a wave (indistinguishable and interconnected).

What these concepts tell us is that, at the heart of our universe, there are no separate parts to anything, and that everything is connected to everything else. Moreover, they explain how information can be transferred superluminously, or faster than the speed of light. For example, if two photons are non-locally connected, communication between them can be instantaneous because they are not truly separate.

These discoveries from quantum physics have important implications for the evolution of human consciousness predicted by the Andean prophecies. As Bohm states, the world is an “unbroken wholeness”; everything is non-locally interconnected. We need to learn to perceive holistically because our world and the entire universe is actually interconnected. It is erroneous to continue to perceive our world as a conglomeration of separate, unrelated parts. In light of emergent scientific principles, the Cartesian world view is decidedly misleading.

Moreover, this holistic way of perceiving the world mirrors the teachings of ancient people such as the Inca.   … Buddhist and Hindu teachings have long told us that everything is energy dancing in form, and that the dance is a continuous weaving of the form and the formless. Now research from the frontiers of science is telling us the same thing.

The Indra’s Net

“Far away in the heavenly abode of the great god Indra, there is a wonderful net which has been hung by some cunning artificer in such a manner that it stretches out indefinitely in all directions. In accordance with the extravagant tastes of deities, the artificer has hung a single glittering jewel at the net’s every node, and since the net itself is infinite in dimension, the jewels are infinite in number. There hang the jewels, glittering like stars of the first magnitude, a wonderful sight to behold. If we now arbitrarily select one of these jewels for inspection and look closely at it, we will discover that in its polished surface there are reflected all the other jewels in the net, infinite in number. Not only that, but each of the jewels reflected in this one jewel is also reflecting all the other jewels, so that the process of reflection is infinite. The Hua’yen school [of Buddhism] has been fond of this image, mentioned many times in its literature, because it symbolizes a cosmos in which there is an infinitely repeated interrelationship among all the members of the cosmos. This relationship is said to be one of simultaneous mutual identity and mututal intercausality.”

~ Francis H. Cook, Hua-yen Buddhism: The Jewel Net of Indra

Indra's net

There are several aspects of Indra’s Net, as described in the above quote, that signify it as a crystal clear allegory of reality:

1. The Holographic Nature of the Universe

Long before the existence of the hologram, the jeweled net is an excellent description of the special characteristic of holograms: that every point of the hologram contains information regarding all other points. This reflective nature of the jewels is an obvious reference to this.

This kind of analogy has been suggested by science as a theory for an essential characteristic of the cosmos, as well as as the functioning of the human brain, as beautifully described inThe Holograpic Universe by Michael Talbot.

2. The Interconnectedness of All Thingss

When any jewel in the net is touched, all other jewels in the node are affected. This speaks to the hidden interconnectedness and interdependency of everything and everyone in the universe, and has an indirect reference to the concept of “Dependent Origination” in Buddhism. Additionally, Indra’s Net is a definitive ancient correlate of Bell’s Theorum, or the theory of non-local causes.

3. Lack of a substantive self

Each node, representing an individual, simply reflects the qualities of all other nodes, inferring the notion of ‘not-self’ or a lack of a solid and real inherent self, as seen in the Advaita Vedanta school of Hinduism and Buddhism in general.

4. Non-locality

Indra’s Net shoots holes in the assumption or imputation of a solid and fixed universe ‘out there’. The capacity of one jewel to reflect the light of another jewel from the other edge of infinity is something that is difficult for the linear mind, rational mind to comprehend. The fact that all nodes are simply reflections indicates that there is no particular single source point from where it all arises.

5. Innate Wisdom

The ability to reflect the entirety of all light in the universe attests to the inherent transcendant wisdom that is at the core of all nodes, representing all sentient beings, and to the inherent Buddha Nature.

6. Illusion or Maya

The fact that all nodes are simply a reflection of all others implies the illusory nature of all appearances. Appearances are thus not reality but a reflection of reality.

7. Universal Creativity

A familiar concept in various high dharmas is one of an impersonal creative intelligence that springs forth into reality through the instruments of all living beings.

8. The Mirror-like Nature of Mind

The capacity to reflect all things attests to the mind being a mirror of reality, not its basis. This is a common thesis among various schools and religions.

This article is from: http://www.heartspace.org/

“In the Service of Love” by Suzanne Deakins, H.W., M.

In The Service of Love 3 PM Pacific Time on Acimgather Paltalk

I didn’t even begin to understand love until I was in my early twenties. I had warm heart feelings for many people and ideas and I often called this love. I thought love was for the lucky person.  I had no idea who and what I really was.

Then came my first child. Through the pain and fear my first child was born. They brought Gregg to me. Swaddled in sterile blankets. Looking down I saw the small face scrunch up and moving its lips in a sucking motion. Becom­ing overwhelmed with emotion, for the first time I knew absolute love and beheld the face of God. This small bundle carried the face of God and absolute love.

My path has taken me down many avenues of love. One thing I am certain of is that the appearance withstanding it has been a path of love, Absolute Love. Love has no opposites and does not reside in the binary world of duality. It is never lacking, is ever evenly present. The human mind is too feeble to grasp the enormity of what the creator of all life has done. We try to take this abstract idea, this nothing and make it physical. We name it label it, give it opposite saying such things that fear is the opposite of love. Fear is an ego thought and idea. Love is of the creator and is the manifestation of all life. Life has been created in love. We are the manifestation of love. We are a vessel of love in the service of love.

To be in the service of love is not a right or a privilege it is a mandate of our creator source. Our feeble human thinking wants us to see the beginnings and endings to see lack and fear.

Ego thought tells us to form categories, to be afraid, it tells us God/Truth/One Mind and love are hiding from us. It says we have been abandoned by love, God, Truth, and one mind. This leads us down a path of constant looking rather than just being and seeing all we need and are already is.

God/Truth has never hidden. Love is all life manifesting and can’t be covered up with pain and sorrow… it cant be the opposite of fear… for fear is a human thought and Love is the thought of God, Truth, and Higher Consciousness.  Truth is always present and can’t be absent.

We stand on the brink of our future looking into the vast center of chaos shaking like a small rabbit unable to grasp we are the source of love itself, manifesting it without end. We climb the mountain of Dante every day having found our name in the fires of our own hell. We stand quaking and trembling afraid to descend the mountain to the valley. In the valley, we find our cosmic destination. Our destination in manifesting love in all we do expressing giving and receiving love as love. Dilating out to the universe. You cannot hide from God or Love, for the eyes of the creator source knew you before you were. You are in the service of love every day of life. You have only to open your arms and recognize all that is and every will be, Love.

© Suzane Deakins 2010-2018

When God Whispers available on amazon.com

Onespiritpress.com

onespiritpress@gmail.com

 

Suzanne Deakins, Ph.D., H.W.M.

suzannedeak@gmail.com
503-954-0012

How We Spend Our Days Is How We Spend Our Lives: Annie Dillard on Choosing Presence Over Productivity

By Maria Popova (brainpickings.org)

anniedillard_thewritinglife.jpg?w=680The meaning of life has been pondered by such literary icons as Leo Tolstoy (1904), Henry Miller (1918), Anaïs Nin(1946), Viktor Frankl (1946), Italo Calvino (1975), and David Foster Wallace (2005). And although some have argued that today’s age is one where “the great dream is to trade up from money to meaning,” there is an unshakable and discomfiting sense that, in our obsession with optimizing our creative routines and maximizing our productivity, we have forgotten how to be truly present in the gladdening mystery of life.

From The Writing Life (public library) by Annie Dillard — a wonderful addition to the collected wisdom of beloved writers — comes this beautiful and poignant meditation on the life well lived, reminding us of the tradeoffs between presence and productivity that we’re constantly choosing to make, or not:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngHow we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. What we do with this hour, and that one, is what we are doing. A schedule defends from chaos and whim. It is a net for catching days. It is a scaffolding on which a worker can stand and labor with both hands at sections of time. A schedule is a mock-up of reason and order—willed, faked, and so brought into being; it is a peace and a haven set into the wreck of time; it is a lifeboat on which you find yourself, decades later, still living. Each day is the same, so you remember the series afterward as a blurred and powerful pattern.

anniedillard5.jpg?w=680

She goes on to illustrate this existential tension between presence and productivity with a fine addition to history’s great daily routines and daily rituals:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThe most appealing daily schedule I know is that of a turn-of-the-century Danish aristocrat. He got up at four and set out on foot to hunt black grouse, wood grouse, woodcock, and snipe. At eleven he met his friends, who had also been out hunting alone all morning. They converged “at one of these babbling brooks,” he wrote. He outlined the rest of his schedule. “Take a quick dip, relax with a schnapps and a sandwich, stretch out, have a smoke, take a nap or just rest, and then sit around and chat until three. Then I hunt some more until sundown, bathe again, put on white tie and tails to keep up appearances, eat a huge dinner, smoke a cigar and sleep like a log until the sun comes up again to redden the eastern sky. This is living…. Could it be more perfect?”

Dillard juxtaposes the Danish aristocrat’s revelry in everyday life with the grueling routine of a couple of literary history’s most notorious self-disciplinarians:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngWallace Stevens in his forties, living in Hartford, Connecticut, hewed to a productive routine. He rose at six, read for two hours, and walked another hour—three miles—to work. He dictated poems to his secretary. He ate no lunch; at noon he walked for another hour, often to an art gallery. He walked home from work—another hour. After dinner he retired to his study; he went to bed at nine. On Sundays, he walked in the park. I don’t know what he did on Saturdays. Perhaps he exchanged a few words with his wife, who posed for the Liberty dime. (One would rather read these people, or lead their lives, than be their wives. When the Danish aristocrat Wilhelm Dinesen shot birds all day, drank schnapps, napped, and dressed for dinner, he and his wife had three children under three. The middle one was Karen.)

[…]

Jack London claimed to write twenty hours a day. Before he undertook to write, he obtained the University of California course list and all the syllabi; he spent a year reading the textbooks in philosophy and literature. In subsequent years, once he had a book of his own under way, he set his alarm to wake him after four hours’ sleep. Often he slept through the alarm, so, by his own account, he rigged it to drop a weight on his head. I cannot say I believe this, though a novel like The Sea-Wolf is strong evidence that some sort of weight fell on his head with some sort of frequency — but you wouldn’t think a man would claim credit for it. London maintained that every writer needed a technique, experience, and a philosophical position.

annie.jpg?w=680

At the heart of these anecdotes of living is a dynamic contemplation of life itself:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThere is no shortage of good days. It is good lives that are hard to come by. A life of good days lived in the senses is not enough. The life of sensation is the life of greed; it requires more and more. The life of the spirit requires less and less; time is ample and its passage sweet. Who would call a day spent reading a good day? But a life spent reading — that is a good life. A day that closely resembles every other day of the past ten or twenty years does not suggest itself as a good one. But who would not call Pasteur’s life a good one, or Thomas Mann’s?

The Writing Life is sublime in its entirety, the kind of book that stays with you for lifetimes.

Illustration by Wendy MacNaughton

Your Horoscopes — Week Of September 18, 2018 (theonion.com)

Virgo | Aug. 23 to Sept. 22

Remember: You are just one man. Stop insisting that you’re a 1960s girl group.

Libra | Sept. 23 to Oct. 22

You hardly even matter any more. Libra will be soon be cancelled without further notice.

Scorpio | Oct. 23 to Nov. 21

New mindscapes open before you when your cat’s ear mites bore their way into your brain’s temporal lobe.

Sagittarius | Nov. 22 to Dec. 21

Looking back, you can’t figure out how a win/win situation turned into a win/be savaged by wild boars situation.

Capricorn | Dec. 22 to Jan. 19

Your shock will be mixed with a sense of indignation and embarrassment when a gritty band of cattle rustlers steals your spouse.

Aquarius | Jan. 20 to Feb. 18

A milestone looms before you on your life’s road. Reassure yourself by considering that “forty” is not “the F-word.”

Pisces | Feb. 19 to March 20

Your continuing hair loss leaves you with what some may call a bald spot. Only you will know that it is in truth a solar panel.

Aries | March 21 to April 19

A wonderful romantic experience looms ahead for Cancer, which makes it suck that you’re an Aries.

Taurus | April 20 to May 20

Childhood fears rear their ugly head once more this week when a mistakenly swallowed seed results in a 12-pound watermelon growing out of your rectum.

Gemini | May 21 to June 20

You will be shaken to your very core when you are strapped to a four-horsepower hardware-store paint shaker.

Cancer | June 21 to July 22

You will be overjoyed when surgeons manage to remove the adze from your skull, but quickly realize it was the only thing that made you special.

Leo | July 23 to Aug. 22

Spice things up in your bedroom this week: Come home 15 minutes early from work without telling your spouse, but be ready for a surprise.

Amid our Nation’s Mounting Democracy Crisis, Hope Is Power

Hope ignites our brains toward solutions

Let us drop any thought that hope is a weakling. (Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Yeah, I know. “Hope” gets shoved into a corner called “nice” where weaklings huddle who can’t face hard realities. In fact, hope and power don’t often show up in the same sentence.

Truth is, though, hope is a tap root of power.

First, note that the word power derives from the Latin, posse, “to be able.” It is our capacity to act. So understood, power seems rather impossible without its partner, hope; for most of us have a hard time acting without at least a bit of it.

Then consider the work of Harvard’s Srini Pillay, who grapples with hope’s power from the world of psychiatry and neuroscience. In Life Unlocked he explains that hope has the power to help reorganize our brains toward solutions. “When the brain thinks that something is possible, it sketches out the route for achieving it.”

“Hope is not an answer,” he underscores, but because it stimulates the imagination “hope helps us to pose the right questions.” And, I’ve learned that asking the right questions is foundational to achieving just about any goal.

And then Pillay adds the kicker.

Because “hope seems to travel in the same dungeons [parts of the brain] as fear, it might be a good soldier to employ if we want to meet fear.” That sure sounds like power to me.

And there’s yet another way hope wields power. It is the power to attract. When I sense hope in someone, immediately I am attracted. I want some of that!

And, in an era of multiplying threats, don’t all of us, more than ever, want others near us?

Given our nation’s mounting democracy crisis, with a president violating norms and rules that we long thought had protected us, don’t we want others—in fact, millions more—joining together in the good work of fixing our democracy’s system flaws that allowed this sad turn? Don’t we want citizens closing the doors to big, secret money  drowning out the voices of regular citizens?

Yes. Yes. Yes.

We want to attract strangers—people who’ve never ever been engaged in public actions—to join the work of hope that is the Democracy Movement.

Hope, I’m convinced, is one key to the birth and speedy growth of Democracy Initiative, an organization that in just five years has attracted nearly 70 national organizations—from labor to the environment to racial justice—representing 40 million Americans committed to pursuing reforms together to make democracy work for all of us.

A scowl of anger or despair won’t draw in more new faces.  Hope will. Hope is contagious, and that’s a really good thing.

So, let us drop any thought that hope is a weakling.

No. It’s pure muscle.

Hope ignites our brains toward solutions. It gets us asking the right questions. It counters fear. It attracts others.  Wow.

Yes, hope is power, what we need now more than ever to fortify us to act boldly.

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