Word-built world

gank

ɡaNGk/

verb

verb: gank; verb: ganked; gerund or present participle: ganking; 3rd person present: ganks; past participle: ganked
  1. 1.
    take or steal (something).
    “if I have the money, I won’t have to gank the books”
    • defraud or rob (someone).
      “they can take trade-ins of new releases and sell them for $55, essentially ganking the publishers”
  2. 2.
    (in a video game) use underhand means to defeat or kill (a less experienced opponent).
    “that troll just ganked me”
Origin

1980s: origin uncertain; perhaps imitative or perhaps a shortening of an altered pronunciation of gangster.

Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) is a mental health problem in which a caregiver makes up or causes an illness or injury in a person under his or her care, such as a child, an elderly adult, or a person who has a disability. Because vulnerable people are the victims, MSBP is a form of child abuse or elder abuse.

psychedelic

ˌsīkəˈdelik/
adjective
adjective: psychedelic
  1. 1.
    relating to or denoting drugs (especially LSD) that produce hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness.
    synonyms: hallucinatorytrippy, dream-like, mind-bendingmind-alteringmind-expandingmind-blowingbizarresurreal

    “a psychedelic experience”
    • relating to or denoting a style of rock music originating in the mid 1960s, characterized by musical experimentation and drug-related lyrics.
    • denoting or having an intense, vivid color or a swirling abstract pattern.
      “a psychedelic T-shirt”
      synonyms: colorfulchromaticmulticoloredvividabstract

      “psychedelic design”
noun
noun: psychedelic; plural noun: psychedelics
  1. 1.
    a psychedelic drug.

Origin:     

1950s: formed irregularly from psyche1 + Greek dēlos ‘clear, manifest’ + -ic.
monopsony : one buyer, many sellers
duopsony : two buyers, many sellers
oligopsony : a few buyers, many sellers
monopoly : one seller, many buyers
duopoly : two sellers, many buyers
oligopoly : a few sellers, many buyers

anodyne

ˈanəˌdīn/
adjective
adjective: anodyne
not likely to provoke dissent or offense; inoffensive, often deliberately so.
“anodyne New Age music”
noun
noun: anodyne; plural noun: anodynes
a painkilling drug or medicine.
Origin:  mid 16th century: via Latin from Greek anōdunos ‘painless,’ from an- ‘without’ + odunē ‘pain.’

adonize

PRONUNCIATION:
(AD-uh-nyz)
MEANING:
verb tr.: To make more attractive; to spruce up.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Adonis, a beautiful youth in Greek mythology, loved by Aphrodite. Adonis’s name has become a synonym for a very handsome young man. Earliest documented use: 1611.
 
Smile comes from the root word miracle (Partridge’s “Origins.”)
 
Screen memory a recollection of early childhood that may be falsely recalled or magnified in importance and that masks another memory of deep emotional significance. (merriam-webster.com)

amanuensis

əˌmanyəˈwensəs/
noun: amanuensis; plural noun: amanuenses
    1. a literary or artistic assistant, in particular one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.

      </div

      Origin:  early 17th century: Latin, from (servus) a manu ‘(slave) at hand(writing), secretary’ + -ensis ‘belonging to.’
      leeway
      PRONUNCIATION:
      (LEE-way) 
      MEANING:
      noun: The amount of freedom to do something: margin or latitude.
      ETYMOLOGY:

      In nautical terminology, leeway is the sideways drift of a ship to leeward (away from wind). From Old English hleo (shelter) + way. Earliest documented use: 1669.

      pontificate
      verb
      1.  (in the Roman Catholic Church) officiate as bishop, especially at Mass.
      2.  express one’s opinions in a way considered annoyingly pompous and dogmatic:
      “he was pontificating about art and history”
      synonyms:
        hold forth, expound, declaim, preach, lay down the law, sound off, dogmatize, sermonize, moralize, lecture, preachify, mouth off, bloviate  (from Robert McEwen, H.W., M.)

corpocracy

PRONUNCIATION:
(kor-POK-ruh-see)
MEANING:
noun: A society in which corporations control the government.
ETYMOLOGY:
From corporate, from Latin corpus (body) + -cracy (rule). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kwrep- (body, form), which is also the source of corps, corpus, corpse, corporation, corpulent, corset, corsage, leprechaun, and corpus delicti. Earliest documented use: 1935.

feint

PRONUNCIATION (faynt)

MEANING:
noun: A deceptive move, especially in fencing or boxing.
verb tr., intr.: Tomake a deceptive movement.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French feinte, pastparticiple of feindre (to feign), from Latin fingere (to shape). Ultimately from the Indo-European root dheigh- (to build or form), which also gave us fiction, effigy, paradise, dough, dairy, and lady (literally, a loaf kneader). Earliest documented use: around 1330.

instantiate

inˈstan(t)SHēˌāt/
verb
gerund or present participle: instantiating
  1. represent as or by an instance.
    “a study of two groups who seemed to instantiate productive aspects of this”
    • PHILOSOPHY
      (of a universal or abstract concept) have an instance; be represented by an actual example.
Origin:  1940s: from Latin instantia (see instance) + -ate.
 
ensorcell
enˈsôrsəl/

verb

literary
past tense: ensorcelled; past participle: ensorcelled
  1. enchant; fascinate.
Origin:  mid 16th century: from Old French ensorceler, alteration of ensorcerer, from sorcier ‘sorcerer.’
rope-a-dope
ˈrōpəˌdōp/

noun

USinformal
noun: rope-a-dope
  1. a boxing tactic of pretending to be trapped against the ropes, goading an opponent to throw tiring ineffective punches.
Origin:  1970s: coined by Muhammad Ali, referring to a tactic in a boxing match with George Foreman.
The John Lewis business model gives each employee part-ownership of the company, a share of its annual profits, and a say in how it is run. In theory, it makes employees more invested – literally – in their work, and so heightens both productivity and profits.
Pneumonia is a breathing condition in which there is swelling or an infection of the lungs or large airways. Aspiration pneumonia occurs when food, saliva, liquids, or vomit is breathed into the lungs or airways leading to the lungs, instead of being swallowed into the esophagus and stomach.  [Hillary Clinton was said to have “aspirational pneumonia” after falling at the 9/11 memorial in 2016.  Too much aspiration?]

The Odic force (also called Od [õd], Odyle, Önd, Odes, Odylic, Odyllic, or Odems) is the name given in the mid-19th century to a hypothetical vital energy or life force by Baron Carl von Reichenbach. Von Reichenbach coined the name from that of the Norse god Odin in 1845.

teleology

ˌtelēˈäləjē,ˌtēlēˈäləjē/

noun

PHILOSOPHY
noun: teleology; plural noun: teleologies
  1. the explanation of phenomena by the purpose they serve rather than by postulated causes.
    • THEOLOGY
      the doctrine of design and purpose in the material world.
Origin:  mid 18th century (denoting the branch of philosophy that deals with ends or final causes): from modern Latin teleologia, from Greek telos ‘end’ + -logia (see -logy).
Synesthesia is a condition in which one sense (for example, hearing) is simultaneously perceived as if by one or more additional senses such as sight. Another form of synesthesia joins objects such as letters, shapes, numbers or people’s names with a sensory perception such as smell, color or flavor.
Image result for ley lines
Ley lines /leɪ laɪnz/ are apparent alignments of land forms, places of ancient religious significance or culture, often including man-made structures. They are ancient, straight ‘paths’ or routes in the landscape which are believed to have spiritual significance.

chillax

PRONUNCIATION:
(chi-LAKS) 
MEANING:
verb intr.: To calm down and relax.
ETYMOLOGY:
A blend of chill + relax. Earliest documented use: 1999.
USAGE:
“Chillax, sit back, just take it slow
make every effort to unwind
let the calming breeze just blow
away those worries from your mind.”
J.R. Winchester; The Word According Two; Lulu; 2016.
 
wegotism
PRONUNCIATION:
(WEE-guh-tiz-uhm) 
MEANING:
noun: The habit of using “we” when referring to oneself.
ETYMOLOGY:
A blend of we + egotism. Earliest documented use: 1797. Also see nosismroyal we, and illeist.
 

Parousia

pəˈro͞ozēə,ˌpäro͞oˈsēə/

noun

CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
noun: Parousia; plural noun: Parousias
  1. another term for Second Coming.
Origin:  Greek, literally ‘being present.’

reify

ˈrēəˌfī/

verb

formal
verb: reify; 3rd person present: reifies; past tense: reified; past participle: reified; gerund or present participle: reifying
  1. make (something abstract) more concrete or real.
    “these instincts are, in humans, reified as verbal constructs”
Origin:  mid 19th century: from Latin resre- ‘thing’ + -fy.
 
kakistocracy (English pronunciation: /kækɪsˈtɑkɹəsi/) is a system of government which is run by the worst, least qualified, or most unscrupulous citizens. The word was coined as early as the 17th century. It was also used by English author Thomas Love Peacock in 1829, but gained significant usage in the 21st century.
Kairos (καιρός) is an Ancient Greek word meaning the right, critical or opportune moment. The ancient Greeks had two words for timechronos (χρόνος) and kairos. While the former refers to chronological or sequential time, the latter signifies a proper or opportune time for action. What is happening when referring to kairos depends on who is using the word. While chronos is quantitative, kairos has a qualitative, permanent nature. Kairos also means weather in Modern Greek. The plural, καιροί (kairoi (Ancient and Modern Greek)) means the times.

anamnesis

ˌanəmˈnēsis/
noun
  1. recollection, in particular.
    • the remembering of things from a supposed previous existence (often used with reference to Platonic philosophy).
      noun: anamnesis
    • MEDICINE
      a patient’s account of a medical history.
      noun: anamnesis; plural noun: anamneses
    • CHRISTIAN CHURCH
      the part of the Eucharist in which the Passion, Resurrection, and Ascension of Christ are recalled.
Origin:  late 16th century: from Greek anamnēsis ‘remembrance.’

country

ˈkəntrē/
noun: country; plural noun: countries; noun: the country
  1. 1.
    a nation with its own government, occupying a particular territory.
    “the country’s increasingly precarious economic position”
Origin:  Middle English: from Old French cuntree, from medieval Latin contrata (terra ) ‘(land) lying opposite,’ from Latin contra ‘against, opposite.’

proprioceptive

ˌprōprēəˈseptiv/

adjective

PHYSIOLOGY
adjective: proprioceptive
  1. relating to stimuli that are produced and perceived within an organism, especially those connected with the position and movement of the body.
Origin:  early 20th century: from Latin proprius ‘own’ + receptive.

endogenous

PRONUNCIATION:
(en-DOJ-uh-nuhs) 
MEANING:
adjective: Originating from within.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek endo- (inside, within) + -genous (producing). Earliest documented use: 1830. The opposite is exogenous.

hagiology

PRONUNCIATION:
(hag-ee-OL-uh-jee, hay-jee-) 
MEANING:
noun: Literature dealing with the lives of saints or other venerated figures.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek hagio- (holy) + -logy (study). Earliest documented use: 1807.

oblivious

əˈblivēəs/
adjective
adjective: oblivious
  1. not aware of or not concerned about what is happening around one.
    “she became absorbed, oblivious to the passage of time”
    synonyms: unaware of, unconscious of, heedless of, unmindful of, insensible of/to, unheeding of, ignorant of, incognizant of, blind to, deaf to, unsuspecting of, unobservant of; More

    antonyms: awareconscioussensitive
Origin:  late Middle English: from Latin obliviosus, from oblivio(n-) (see oblivion).

cretin

ˈkrētn/
noun
noun: cretin; plural noun: cretins
  1. 1.
    informaloffensive
    a stupid person (used as a general term of abuse).
  2. 2.
    MEDICINEdated
    a person who is deformed and mentally handicapped because of congenital thyroid deficiency.
Origin:  late 18th century: from French crétin, from Swiss French crestin ‘Christian’ (from Latin Christianus ), here used to mean ‘human being,’ apparently as a reminder that, though deformed, cretins were human and not beasts.

precarious

prəˈkerēəs/
adjective
adjective: precarious
  1. 1.
    not securely held or in position; dangerously likely to fall or collapse.
    “a precarious ladder”
  2. 2.
    dependent on chance; uncertain.
    “she made a precarious living by writing”
    synonyms: uncertaininsecureunpredictableriskyparloushazardousdangerousunsafe. antonyms: safe
Origin:  mid 17th century: from Latin precarius ‘obtained by entreaty’ (from prexprec- ‘prayer’) + -ous.

inferior

comes from the word Inferno (Italian for Hell) (from Partridge’s “Origins:  A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English)

exigent 

ˈekzəjənt/

adjective

formal
adjective: exigent
  1. pressing; demanding.
    “the exigent demands of the music took a toll on her voice”
Origin:  early 17th century: from Latin exigent- ‘completing, ascertaining,’ from the verb exigere (see exact).
 

synchronicity

ˌsiNGkrəˈnisədē/
noun
noun: synchronicity
  1. 1.
    the simultaneous occurrence of events that appear significantly related but have no discernible causal connection.
    “such synchronicity is quite staggering”
  2. 2.
    another term for synchrony (sense 1).
Origin1950s: coined (in sense 1) by C. G. Jung.

perfunctory

pərˈfəNG(k)t(ə)rē/
adjective
adjective: perfunctory
  1. (of an action or gesture) carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection.
    “he gave a perfunctory nod”
    synonyms: cursorydesultoryquickbriefhastyhurriedrapidfleetingtokencasualsuperficialcareless,

    halfheartedsketchymechanicalautomaticroutineoffhandinattentive, “a perfunctory review”

    antonyms: carefulthorough
Origin:  late 16th century: from late Latin perfunctorius ‘careless,’ from Latin perfunct- ‘done with, discharged,’ from the verb perfungi .
 

aesthetician

ˌesTHəˈtiSHən/
noun
noun: esthetician
  1. 1.
    a person who is knowledgeable about the nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in art.
  2. 2.
    NORTH AMERICAN
    a beautician.

immutable

i(m)ˈmyo͞odəb(ə)l/
adjective
adjective: immutable
  1. unchanging over time or unable to be changed.
    “an immutable fact”
    synonyms: fixedsetrigidinflexiblepermanentestablished, carved in stone; More
Origin:  late Middle English: from Latin immutabilis, from in- ‘not’ + mutabilis (see mutable).

synoptic

PRONUNCIATION:
(suh-NOP-tik, si-) 
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Relating to a summary or general view of something.
2. Covering a wide area (as weather conditions).
3. Taking a similar view (as the first three Gospels of the Bible: Matthew, Mark, and Luke).
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek synopsis (general view), from syn- (together) + opsis (view). Earliest documented use: 1764.

autotelic

A thing which is autotelic is described as “having a purpose in and not apart from itself”.

OriginsThe word comes from the Greek αὐτοτελής autotelēs from αὐτός autos, “self” and τέλος telos, “goal”.  (wikipedia.org and Michael Kelly)

 

benighted

bəˈnīdəd/
adjective
adjective: benighted
  1. 1.
    in a state of pitiful or contemptible intellectual or moral ignorance, typically owing to a lack of opportunity.
    “they saw themselves as bringers of culture to poor benighted peoples”
  2. 2.
    overtaken by darkness.
    “a storm developed and we were forced to wait benighted near the summit”
Origin:  late 16th century (sense 2): past participle of archaic benight ‘cover in the darkness of night, obscure’ (see be-night).

kinetic

kəˈnedik/
adjective
adjective: kinetic
  1. relating to or resulting from motion.
    • (of a work of art) depending on movement for its effect.
Origin:  mid 19th century: from Greek kinētikos, from kinein ‘to move.’
 

micturate

ˈmikCHəˌrāt/

verb

formal
gerund or present participle: micturating
  1. urinate.
Origin:  mid 19th century: back-formation from micturition, from Latin micturit- ‘urinated,’ from the verb micturire

analgesic

PRONUNCIATION:
(an-uhl-JEE-zik, -sik)
MEANING:
adjective: Reducing or eliminating pain.
noun: Something that reduces or relieves pain.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin analgesia (absence of pain), from Greek analgesia, from an- (not) + algos (pain). Earliest documented use: 1852.

debunk

PRONUNCIATION:
(di-BUNGK) 
MEANING:
verb tr.: To expose the falseness of a claim, myth, belief, etc.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Buncombe, a county in North Carolina. In 1820, Felix Walker, a representative from that area, made a pointless speech in the US Congress. While his colleagues in Congress urged him to stop and move to vote on an issue, Walker claimed that he had to make a speech “for Buncombe”. Eventually, “Buncombe” became a synonym for meaningless speech, became shortened to “bunkum”, and then to “bunk”. And if there’s bunk, it’s one’s duty to debunk. Earliest documented use: 1923.
annihilate
əˈnīəˌlāt/
verb
verb: annihilate; 3rd person present: annihilates; past tense: annihilated; past participle: annihilated; gerund or present participle: annihilating
  1. destroy utterly; obliterate.
    “a simple bomb of this type could annihilate them all”
    synonyms: destroy, wipe out, obliterate, wipe off the face of the earth; More

    antonyms: create
    • defeat utterly.
      “the stronger force annihilated its opponent virtually without loss”
    • PHYSICS
      convert (a subatomic particle) into radiant energy.
Originlate Middle English (originally as an adjective meaning ‘destroyed, annulled’): from late Latin annihilatus‘reduced to nothing,’ from the verb annihilare, from ad- ‘to’ + nihil ‘nothing.’ The verb sense ‘destroy utterly’ dates from the mid 16th century.
solecize
PRONUNCIATION:
(SOL-uh-syz) 
MEANING:
verb intr.: To make an error in language, etiquette, etc.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Soloi, an ancient Athenian colony in Cilicia, whose dialect the Athenians considered as substandard. Earliest documented use: 1627. The noun form is solecism

Cressida

(//ˈkrɛsdə; also CriseidaCresseid or Criseyde) is a character who appears in many Medieval and Renaissance retellings of the story of the Trojan War. She is a Trojan woman, the daughter of Calchas, a Greek seer. She falls in love with Troilus, the youngest son of King Priam, and pledges everlasting love, but when she is sent to the Greeks as part of a hostage exchange, she forms a liaison with the Greek warrior Diomedes. In later culture she becomes an archetype of a faithless lover.

middlescence

PRONUNCIATION:
(mid-uhl-ES-uhns) 
MEANING:
noun: The middle-age period of life.
ETYMOLOGY:

Patterned after adolescence. Earliest documented use: 1965 (adolescence is from 1425).

prise (praɪzor prize

vb (tr)

1. to force open by levering
2. to extract or obtain with difficulty: they had to prise the news out of him.

n

(Tools) rare or dialect a tool involving leverage in its use or the leverage so employed

US and Canadian equivalent: pry

[C17: from Old French prise a taking, from prendre to take, from Latin prehendere; see prize1]

unitasking

PRONUNCIATION:
(YOO-ni-tas-king) 
MEANING:
noun: Doing one thing at a time.
ETYMOLOGY:

Patterned after the word multitasking. Earliest documented use: 1985 (multitasking is from 1966).

Origin:  early 20th century: from Russian, literally ‘devastation,’ from gromit’ ‘destroy by the use of violence.’

empyrean

PRONUNCIATION:
(em-PIR-ee-uhn, -pye-REE-) 
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Relating to the highest heaven, believed to contain pure light or fire.
2. Relating to the sky; celestial.
3. Sublime; elevated.
ETYMOLOGY:

From Latin empyreus, from Greek empyrios (fiery), from pur (fire). Other words derived from the same root are fire, pyre, pyrosis (heartburn), and pyromania (an irresistible impulse to set things on fire). Earliest documented use: 1500. A synonym of the word is empyreal.

pogrom

ˈpōɡrəm,pəˈɡräm/
noun
noun: pogrom; plural noun: pogroms
  1. an organized massacre of a particular ethnic group, in particular that of Jews in Russia or eastern Europe.
    synonyms: massacreslaughtermass murderannihilationexterminationdecimationcarnagebloodbathbloodlettingbutcherygenocideholocaustpurgeethnic cleansing

    “how is it that every civilized nation has not formally denounced this pogrom?”

hap

MEANING:
noun: 1. Chance; fortune.
2. An occurrence.
verb tr.: 1. To occur.
2. To clothe, cover, or wrap.
ETYMOLOGY:
For noun and verb 1: From Old Norse happ (good luck). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kobe (to suit, fit, or succeed), which also gave us happen, happy, hapless, and mishap. Earliest documented use: 1350.
For verb 2: Of uncertain origin. Earliest documented use: 1390.

tarantism

ˈterənˌtizəm/
noun
noun: tarantism
  1. a psychological illness characterized by an extreme impulse to dance, prevalent in southern Italy from the 15th to the 17th century, and widely believed at the time to have been caused by the bite of a tarantula.

Origin:   mid 17th century: from Italian tarantismo, from the name of the seaport Taranto, after which the tarantula is also named. Compare with tarantella.

dox

däks/

verb

informal
verb: dox; 3rd person present: doxes; past tense: doxed; past participle: doxed; gerund or present participle: doxing; verb: doxx; 3rd person present: doxxes; past tense: doxxed; past participle: doxxed; gerund or present participle: doxxing
  1. search for and publish private or identifying information about (a particular individual) on the Internet, typically with malicious intent.
    “hackers and online vigilantes routinely dox both public and private figures”

Origin:   early 21st century: alteration of docs, plural of doc (short for document).

eponymous

əˈpänəməs/
adjective
adjective: eponymous
  1. (of a person) giving their name to something.
    “the eponymous hero of the novel”
    • (of a thing) named after a particular person.
      “Roseanne’s eponymous hit TV series”

pré·cis

prāˈsē,ˈprāsē/
noun
noun: precis; plural noun: precis; noun: précis; plural noun: précises
  1. 1.
    a summary or abstract of a text or speech.
    synonyms: summarysynopsisrésuméabstractoutline, summarization, summationMore
verb
verb: precis; 3rd person present: precises; past tense: precised; past participle: precised; gerund or present participle: precising; verb: précis; 3rd person present: précises; gerund or present participle: précissing; past tense: précissed; past participle: précissed
  1. 1.
    make a précis of (a text or speech).
Origin:  mid 18th century: from French précis, literally ‘precise’ (adjective used as a noun).

haptic

1 : relating to or based on the sense of touch. 2 : characterized by a predilection for the sense of touch a haptic person.

steganography

ˌsteɡəˈnäɡrəfi/
noun
noun: steganography
  1. the practice of concealing messages or information within other nonsecret text or data.

Origin:   late 16th century: modern Latin steganographia, from Greek steganos ‘covered’ + -graphy.

deracinate 

  • dēˈrasəˌnāt/

    verb

    literary
    gerund or present participle: deracinating
    1. tear (something) up by the roots.

    Origin:   late 16th century: from French déraciner, from dé- (expressing removal) + racine ‘root’ (based on Latin radix ).

Robinson Crusoe

PRONUNCIATION:
(ROB-in-suhn KROO-soh) 


MEANING:
verb tr.: To maroon, to isolate, or to abandon.
noun: A castaway; a person who is isolated or without companionship.


ETYMOLOGY:
After the title character of Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe. Crusoe was a shipwrecked sailor who spent 28 years on a remote desert island. Earliest documented use: 1768. Crusoe’s aide has also become an eponym in the English language: man Friday.

penelopize

PRONUNCIATION:
(puh-NEL-uh-pyz) 
MEANING:
verb intr.: To delay or gain time to put off an undesired event.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Penelope, the wife of Odysseus and mother of Telemachus in Greek mythology. She waited 20 years for her husband’s return from the Trojan War (ten years of war, and ten years on his way home). She kept her many suitors at bay by telling them she would marry them when she had finished weaving her web, a shroud for her father-in-law. She wove the web during the day only to unravel it during the night. Earliest documented use: 1780. Her name has become a synonym for a faithful wife: penelope.

mithridatize

PRONUNCIATION:
(MITH-ri-day-tyz) 
MEANING:
verb tr.: To develop immunity to a poison by gradually increasing the dose.
ETYMOLOGY:

After Mithridates VI, king of Pontus (now in Turkey) 120-63 BCE, who is said to have acquired immunity to poison by ingesting gradually larger doses of it. Earliest documented use: 1866. The noun form is mithridatism.

second wind
ˌsekənd ˈwind/
noun
noun: second wind
  1. a person’s ability to breathe freely during exercise, after having been out of breath.
    • a new strength or energy to continue something that is an effort.
      “she gained a second wind during the campaign and turned the opinion polls around”

al·ien·ist

ˈālēənist/
noun
noun: alienist; plural noun: alienists
  1. former term for psychiatrist.
    • US
      a psychiatrist who assesses the competence of a defendant in a court of law.
Origin:  mid 19th century: from French aliéniste, based on Latin alienus ‘of another’ (see alien).

Isolophilia (n.) strong affection for solitude, being left alone.

Omnism 

The recognition and respect of all religions; those who hold this belief are called omnists (or Omnists). The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) quotes as the term’s earliest usage by English poet Philip J. Bailey: in 1839 “I am an omnist, and believe in all religions”.

I like the concept of “Omnism.”
It reminds one that God has one mind/soul, but many faces/bodies.
Also, I can use this term now instead of my old favorite.
I used to say I was a “Hallmarkian,” because I celebrate everything they make cards for.
Love, Janet

ataraxy

adəˌraksē/
noun
noun: ataraxia
  1. a state of serene calmness.
Origin:  early 17th century: from French ataraxie, from Greek ataraxia ‘impassiveness,’ from a- ‘not’ + tarassein ‘disturb.’
  • Word Origin and History for werewolf
    n. late Old English werewulf “person with the power to turn into a wolf,” from wer “man” (see virile )+ wulf (see wolf (n.); also see here for a short discussion of the mythology). Cf. Middle Dutch weerwolfOld High GermanwerwolfSwedish varulfIn the ancient Persian calendar, the eighth month (October-November) was Varkazana-literally “(Month of the) Wolf-Men.”

The bobo, short for bourgeois-bohème (bourgeois-bohemian), who is a middle- or upper-class Parisian who chews on organic food and dons all-natural fibres, yet couldn’t live without their industrially mass-produced iPhone.

emolument

əˈmälyəmənt/

noun: emolument; plural noun: emoluments

  1. a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office.
    “the directors’ emoluments”
    synonyms: salarypaypayment, wage(s), earningsallowancestipendhonorariumrewardpremium;

Origin:  late Middle English: from Latin emolumentum, originally probably ‘payment to a miller for grinding grain,’ from emolere ‘grind up,’ from e- (variant of ex- ) ‘out, thoroughly’ + molere ‘grind.’

orthography

ôrˈTHäɡrəfē/
noun
noun: orthography; plural noun: orthographies
  1. 1.
    the conventional spelling system of a language.
    • the study of spelling and how letters combine to represent sounds and form words.
  2. 2.
    another term for orthographic projection.

Origin:  late Middle English: via Old French and Latin from Greek orthographia, from orthos ‘correct’ + -graphia ‘writing.

volte-face

ˌvältˈfäs,ˌvōltəˈfäs/

nounvolte-face; plural noun: volte-faces

  1. an act of turning around so as to face in the opposite direction.
    • an abrupt and complete reversal of attitude, opinion, or position.
      “a remarkable volte-face on taxes”

Origin:  early 19th century: from French, from Italian voltafaccia, based on Latin volvere ‘to roll’ + facies ‘appearance, face.’

vorfreude

(n) German.definition: feeling of anticipation of something pleasurable or desired in the future.  (Courtesy of Robert McEwen, H.W., M.)

Ostalgie is a German term referring to nostalgia for aspects of life in East Germany. It is a portmanteau of the German words Nostalgie (nostalgia) and Ost (east). Its anglicised equivalent, ostalgia (rhyming with “nostalgia”), is also sometimes used.

eviscerate

əˈvisəˌrāt/

verb

formal
verb: eviscerate; 3rd person present: eviscerates; past tense: eviscerated; past participle: eviscerated; gerund or present participle: eviscerating
  1. disembowel (a person or animal).
    “the goat had been skinned and neatly eviscerated”
    synonyms: disembowelgutdrawdress

    “the goat had been skinned and eviscerated”
    • deprive (something) of its essential content.
      “myriad little concessions that would eviscerate the project”
    • SURGERY
      remove the contents of (a body organ).
Origin:  late 16th century: from Latin eviscerat- ‘disemboweled,’ from the verb eviscerare, from e- (variant of ex- ) ‘out’ + viscera ‘internal organs.’

gaslight

PRONUNCIATION:
(GAS-lyt) 
MEANING:
verb tr.: To manipulate psychologically.
ETYMOLOGY:
From the title of the classic movie Gaslight (1940 and its 1944 remake), based on author Patrick Hamilton’s 1938 play. The title refers to a man’s use of seemingly unexplained dimming of gaslights (among other tricks) in the house in an attempt to manipulate his wife into thinking she is going insane. Earliest documented use: 1969.

Etymology of the word alcohol

To start, let’s take a look at where the root of the word alcohol is derived from. “Alcohol” comes from the Arabic “al-kuhl,” which means “BODY EATING SPIRIT,” (whoa) and this actually serves as the origin for the English word “ghoul.” According to Middle Eastern folklore, a ghoul is an evil demon believed to eat human bodies.
“Alembic” and “alcohol” are both metaphors for aqua vitae, or “life water,” and “spirit” refers to a distilled liquid, which came from Middle Eastern alchemy.  (Courtesy of Robert McEwen, H.W., M.)

roofie

Term for Rohypnol, a sedative that was made in the early 1970s by Roche and was used in hospitals only for deep sedation. It is now a fairly infamous date-rape drug. Has also been known to be used recreationally.

boffin

ˈbäfən/

noun

BRITISHinformal
plural noun: boffins
  1. a person engaged in scientific or technical research.
    “a computer boffin”
    • a person with knowledge or a skill considered to be complex, arcane, and difficult.
      “he had a reputation as a tax boffin, a learned lawyer”
Origin:  World War II: of unknown origin.

par·a·si·tize

ˈperəsiˌtīz,ˈperəsīˌtīz/
verb
past tense: parasitized; past participle: parasitized
  1. infest or exploit (an organism or part) as a parasite.

Analgesic

From analgesia (absence of pain) +‎ -ic, from New Latin, from Ancient Greek ἀν- (an-without) + ἄλγησις (álgēsissense of pain), from ἄλγος (álgospain).

Object

late Middle English: from medieval Latin objectum ‘thing presented to the mind,’ neuter past participle (used as a noun) of Latin obicere, from ob- ‘in the way of’ + jacere ‘to throw’; the verb may also partly represent the Latin frequentative objectare.

Phallogocentrism:  In critical theory and deconstruction, phallogocentrism is a neologism coined by Jacques Derrida to refer to the privileging of the masculine (phallus) in the construction of meaning.

dis·sim·u·late

diˈsimyəˌlāt/
verb
verb: dissimulate; 3rd person present: dissimulates; past tense: dissimulated; past participle: dissimulated; gerund or present participle: dissimulating

garboge

When something is bad, but not just bad, it’s the impossible stupid stuff kind of bad. liking running 100 meters in 5 seconds kind of bad.
proprioception. (prō’prē-ō-sěp’shən) The unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself. In humans, these stimuli are detected by nerves within the body itself, as well as by the semicircular canals of the inner ear.

lust-house

PRONUNCIATION:
(LUST-hous) 
MEANING:
noun:
1. A country house or a summer house.
2. A tavern with a beer garden.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Dutch lusthuis (country house), from German Lusthaus (summer house), from lust (pleasure). Earliest documented use: 1590.

dec·i·mate

ˈdesəˌmāt/
verb
gerund or present participle: decimating

1.  kill, destroy, or remove a large percentage or part of.

“the project would decimate the fragile wetland wilderness”

2.  drastically reduce the strength or effectiveness of (something).

“plant viruses that can decimate yields”
historical :  kill one in every ten of (a group of soldiers or others) as a punishment for the whole group.
Origin:  late Middle English: from Latin decimat- ‘taken as a tenth,’ from the verb decimare, from decimus ‘tenth.’ In Middle English the term decimation denoted the levying of a tithe, and later the tax imposed in England by Cromwell on the Royalists (1655). The verb decimate originally alluded to the Roman punishment of executing one man in ten of a mutinous legion.

au courant

PRONUNCIATION:
(o koo-RAN)  [the last syllable is nasal]
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Up-to-date; fully-informed.
2. Fashionable.
ETYMOLOGY:
From French au courant (literally, in the current, i.e. knowledgeable or up-to-date), from Latin currere (to run). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kers- (to run), which also gave us car, career, carpenter, occur, discharge, caricature, carkdiscursive, and succor. Earliest documented use: 1762.

ineffable

inˈefəb(ə)l/
adjective
adjective: ineffable
  1. too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words.
    “the ineffable natural beauty of the Everglades”
    synonyms: indescribableinexpressible, beyond words, beyond description, begging description;
    • not to be uttered.
      “the ineffable Hebrew name that gentiles write as Jeho
Origin:  late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin ineffabilis, from in- ‘not’ + effabilis (see effable, which means utterable).

pornographic books:  

books that one reads with one hand (anonymous Frenchman).

dogs·bod·y

ˈdôɡzˌbädē/

noun

BRITISHinformal
noun: dogsbody; plural noun: dogsbodies
  1. a person who is given boring, menial tasks to do.
    “I got myself a job as typist and general dogsbody on a small magazine”

nugatory:

PRONUNCIATION:
(NOO-guh-tor-ee, NYOO-) 
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Of little value; trifling.
2. Having no force; ineffective.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin nugatorius (trifling), from nugari (to trifle). Earliest documented use: 1603.

fructify:

PRONUNCIATION:
(FRUHK-tuh-fy, FROOK-) 
MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To make or become fruitful.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin fructificare (to bear fruit), from fructus (fruit). Earliest documented use: 1325.

plethora

PRONUNCIATION:
(PLETH-uhr-uh) 
MEANING:
noun: An abundance or excess.
ETYMOLOGY:

From Latin plethora, from Greek plethore (fullness), from plethein (to be full). In the beginning the word was applied to an excess of a humor, especially blood, in the body. Earliest documented use: 1541.

nemesis

PRONUNCIATION:
(NEM-uh-suhs) 
MEANING:
noun:
1. A formidable opponent or an archenemy.
2. A source of harm or ruin.
3. Retributive justice.
ETYMOLOGY:
In Greek mythology, Nemesis was the goddess of vengeance. From Greek nemesis (retribution), from nemein (to allot). Ultimately from the Indo-European root nem- (to assign or take), which also gave us number, numb, astronomy, renumerate, and anomie. Earliest documented use: 1542.

muse

PRONUNCIATION:
(myooz) 
MEANING:
noun: A source of inspiration.
verb intr.: To be absorbed in thought.
verb tr.: To think or say something thoughtfully.
noun: A state of deep thought.
ETYMOLOGY:
For the first noun: In Greek mythology, the Muses were nine goddesses, each of whom presided over an art or science. A museum is, literally speaking, a shrine to the Muses. Earliest documented use: 1390. Some other words related to the Muses are terpsichorean and calliopean.
For the rest: From Old French muser (to meditate, to idle). Earliest documented use: 1500.

 

anthropogenic
ˌanTHrəpōˈjenik/

adjective
adjective: anthropogenic
  1. (chiefly of environmental pollution and pollutants) originating in human activity.
    “anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide”

Gotham:  You’re likely most familiar with New York City’s “Gotham” nickname from Batman comics and movies, but the nickname actually predates the Dark Knight by nearly 120 years.

Though we tend to think of “Gotham” as a dark, brooding city constantly on the brink of destruction, the term dates back to medieval England. It means “Goat’s Town”  in Anglo-Saxon—which couldn’t be further from how we think of New York City today. It’s also the name of an actual town in England, a sleepy little village in Nottinghamshire. So how did the misnomer come to be?
Author and NYC native Washington Irving started using the term in 1807 in his satirical periodical, Salmagundi. It’s believed that he was inspired by a folk tale called “The Wise Men of Gotham.” In it, residents of England’s Gotham village catch wind that King John will be traveling through their town. Knowing that the king’s visit would bring chaos and turn their quiet village into a circus, the citizens of Gotham decided to feign madness—believed to be contagious at the time—to encourage the king to find another path. They put their plan into action by performing crazy stunts, including trying to drown an eel in a pond and building a fence around a bush to prevent a cuckoo from escaping. The shenanigans worked in this story—King John bypassed Gotham in favor of a town with more sense.

By repeatedly using “Gotham” in a publication created to lampoon New York culture, Irving was poking a little fun at the city and its residents by comparing it to a village where people pretended to be crazy. New Yorkers embraced the moniker, either not aware that Irving was mocking them, or out of pride for being considered craftily crazy.  (mentalfloss.com)

Arrabbiata sauce, or sugo all’arrabbiata in Italian, is a spicy sauce for pasta made from garlic, tomatoes, and red chili peppers cooked in olive oil. Arrabbiata literally means “angry” in Italian; the name of the sauce refers to the spiciness of the chili peppers.

par·ve·nu

ˈpärvəˌn(y)o͞o/
derogatory
noun
noun: parvenu; plural noun: parvenus; noun: parvenue; plural noun: parvenues
  1. a person of obscure origin who has gained wealth, influence, or celebrity.
    “the political inexperience of a parvenu”
    synonyms: upstartsocial climberarriviste

    “make way for our newest little hotshot parvenu”
Origin:  early 19th century: from French, literally ‘arrived,’ past participle of parvenir, from Latin pervenire ‘come to, reach.’

chrysalis

PRONUNCIATION:
(KRIS-uh-lis) 
plural chrysalises or chrysalides (kri-SAL-i-deez)
MEANING:
noun:
1. A pupa of a moth or butterfly, enclosed in a cocoon.
2. A protective covering.
3. A transitional or developmental stage.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin chrysallis (gold-colored pupa of a butterfly), from Greek khrusos (gold). Earliest documented use: 1658.

imago

PRONUNCIATION:
(i-MAY-go, -MAH-) 
plural imagoes or imagines (i-MAY-guh-neez)
MEANING:
noun:
1. The final or adult stage of an insect.
2. An idealized image of someone, formed in childhood and persisting in later life.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin imago (image). Ultimately from the Indo-European root aim- (copy), which also gave us emulate, imitate, image, imagine, and emulous. Earliest documented use: 1787
at·a·vis·tic
ˌadəˈvistik/
adjective
adjective: atavistic
  1. relating to or characterized by reversion to something ancient or ancestral.
    “atavistic fears and instincts”
Origin:  late 19th century: based on Latin atavus ‘forefather,’ via French atavisme, + -ic.
lustify:
To extremely enjoy or like something.
Example: I lustify that movie, it was great
  • Origin and Etymology of phallus

    Latin, from Greek phallos penis, representation of the penis; probably akin to Latin flare to blow — more at blow.  Probably where the term of “BLOW JOB” came from was the word Phallos.  Also the word tracks to a vessel for water in some work tracking.  (Robert McEwen, H.W., M.)
nice:  from Latin nescius meaning ignorant, unaware, literally not-knowing.
allow:  from the Latin ad + laudare meaning “to praise.”

heretic:  from the Greek hairetikos meaning “able to choose.”

pattern:  is from the Latin pater, meaning father.

carcinoma:  a malignant tumor of epithelial origin.

epithelium and feminine derive from the Greek thele, meaning nipple.

masturbation:  disturbing male seed.

orthodoxy:  straight thinking.

philanthropy:  lover of mankind.

apocalypse:  from Greek, meaning an unveiling, a moment in which something is revealed that changes our perception of everything (definition via Nathan Schneider)

idiot:  comes from Greek idios  which means “one’s own, peculiar to oneself.” We see it in our English word idiosyncrasy and idiomatic—and it is where we get the word idiot, or a person who is consumed with himself.

approve:  from prove which comes from pro- meaning in favor and bus meaning to be.  So approve means to be in favor of being.

diagnosis:  from Greek dia- meaning through and Greek gnosis meaning knowing.

peripatetic:  disciple of Aristotle from Greek  peripatetikos “given to walking about” (especially while teaching), from peripatein, from peri “around” + patein“to walk.” Aristotle’s custom was to teach while strolling through the Lyceum in Athens.

gullible:  from Middle English cull meaning to pluck or gather.

reify:  to regard (something abstract) as a material or concrete thing.

debt:  from Latin debere meaning to to owe, originally, to keep something away from someone.

experience:  from Latin periculum meaning to attempt or to fail, also fear.  An expert is one who has experienced.

restaurant:  from French restaurer meaning to restore

infant:  comes from Latin infans meaning without speech

axiom: comes from Greek axios meaning worthy

atom:  comes from the Latin atomus meaning indivisible

bad:  comes from the Old English baeddel meaning effeminate man

Share

Expression, education, communication, community