All posts by Mike Zonta

Theodore Roosevelt on “the man in the arena”

theodoreroosevelt

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

Theodore Roosevelt excerpt from the speech “Citizenship In A Republic” delivered at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France on 23 April, 1910

(BeyondChron.org)

Share

Biography: Charles Fillmore

charlesfillmore

Charles Sherlock Fillmore (August 22, 1854 – July 5, 1948) founded Unity, a church within the New Thought movement, with his wife, Myrtle Page Fillmore, in 1889. He became known as an Americanmystic for his contributions to spiritualist interpretations of biblical Scripture.

Biography

He was born in St. Cloud, Minnesota on August 22, 1854.

An ice skating accident when he was ten broke Fillmore’s hip and left him with lifelong disabilities. In his early years, despite little formal education, he studied Shakespeare, Tennyson, Emerson andLowell as well as works on spiritualism, Eastern religions, and metaphysics.

He met his future wife, Mary Caroline Page, known as Myrtle, in Denison, Texas in the mid-1870s. After losing his job there, he moved to Gunnison, Colorado where he worked at mining and real estate.

He married Myrtle in Clinton, Missouri on March 29, 1881 and the newlyweds moved to Pueblo, Colorado, where Charles established a real estate business with the brother-in-law of Nona Lovell Brooks, who was later to found the Church of Divine Science.

Introduction to New Thought

After the births of their first two sons, Lowell Page Fillmore and Waldo Rickert Fillmore, the family moved to Kansas City, Missouri. Two years later, in 1886, Charles and Myrtle attended New Thoughtclasses held by Dr. E. B. Weeks. Myrtle subsequently recovered from chronic tuberculosis and attributed her recovery to her use of prayer and other methods learned in Weeks’s classes. Subsequently Charles began to heal from his childhood accident, a development which he too attributed to following this philosophy. Charles Fillmore became a devoted student of philosophy andreligion.

In 1889, Charles and Myrtle began publication of a new periodical, ‘Modern Thought’, notable among other things as the first publication to accept for publication the writings of the then 27-year-old New Thought pioneer William Walker Atkinson. In 1890 they announced a prayer group that would later be called ‘Silent Unity’. In 1891, Fillmore’s ‘Unity’ magazine was first published. Dr. H. Emilie Cady published ‘Lessons in Truth’ in the new magazine. This material later was compiled and published in a book by the same name, which served as a seminal work of the Unity Church. Although Charles had no intention of making Unity into a denomination, his students wanted a more organized group. He and his wife were among the first ordained Unity ministers in 1906. Charles and Myrtle Fillmore operated the Unity organizations from a campus near downtown Kansas City.

Death

Myrtle Fillmore died in 1931. Charles remarried in 1933 to Cora G. Dedrick who was a collaborator on his later writings. Charles Fillmore died in 1948. Unity continued, growing into a worldwide movement; Unity World Headquarters at Unity Village and Unity Worldwide Ministries are the organizations of the movement.

Tenets and Beliefs

In a pamphlet called “Answers to Your Questions About Unity” , poet James Dillet Freeman says that Charles and Myrtle both had health problems and turned to some new ideas which they believed helped to improve these problems. Their beliefs are centered on two basic propositions: (1) God is good. (2) God is available; in fact, God is in you. The pamphlet goes on to say that:

About a year after the Fillmores started the magazine Modern Thought, they had the inspiration that if God is what they thought – the principle of love and intelligence, the source of all good – God is wherever needed. It was not necessary for people to be in the same room with them in order for them to unite in thought and prayer.

In his later years, Fillmore felt so young that he thought that he might be physically immortal, as well as believing that he might be the reincarnation of Paul of Tarsus. Charles and Myrtle Fillmore were vegetarians.

(Wikipedia.org)

Share

The Revolt of Mamie Stover (1956)


Set in the early ’40s, a San Francisco prostitute is run out of town just as the second World War has begun to intensify. Mamie settles down in Hawaii, hoping to start a new life. Though her prospects look good when she falls in love with a science-fiction writer who treats her with the respect she deserves, the dawning war and the fallacies of her previous lifestyle complicate their budding romance. Mamie cannot fully remove herself from her former profession, and provides some of her old services to the sailors stationed in town. Searching for another means of financial security, Mamie invests in several pieces of real estate and becomes quite wealthy, though her bad reputation has not been forgotten by the locals.

Jane Russell … Mamie Stover
Richard Egan … Jim Blair
Joan Leslie … Annalee Johnson
Agnes Moorehead … Bertha Parchman
Jorja Curtright … Jackie
Michael Pate … Harry Adkins
Richard Coogan … Capt. Eldon Sumac
Alan Reed … Capt. Gorecki
Eddie Firestone … Tarzan
Jean Willes … Gladys
Leon Lontoc … Aki
Kathy Marlowe … Zelda
Margia Dean … Peaches
Jack Mather … Bartender
John Halloran … Henry

Share

Biography: Myrtle Fillmore

myrtlefillmore

Mary Caroline “Myrtle” Page Fillmore (August 6, 1845 – October 6, 1931) was co-founder of Unity, a church within the New Thought Christian movement, along with her husband Charles Fillmore. Prior to that time, she worked as a schoolteacher.

Biography

Myrtle was the seventh child (of eight) of an Ohio businessman-farmer. Her parents were strictMethodists, but Myrtle rejected their puritanical teachings. She contracted tuberculosis at a young age. Also at a young age she developed a strong enjoyment of reading. At the age of twenty-one she enrolled in the (one year) ‘Literary Course for Ladies’ at Oberlin College. After graduating in 1867, she taught in public schools in Clinton, Missouri, spending the next thirteen years there, except for a year in 1877-78 spent recovering from tuberculosis in Denison, Texas. In Denison, she met her future husband, Charles Fillmore, who was nine years younger than she, and they married in 1881. They lived initially in Gunnison, Colorado, Then moved to Pueblo, Colorado, where their first two sons were born, Lowell in 1882 and Rickert in 1884. The family then moved to Omaha, Nebraska and thenKansas City, Missouri, where their third son, Royal, was born in 1889.

(Wikipedia.org)

Share

Biography: Nona Brooks

nonabrooks

Nona Lovell Brooks (March 22, 1861 – March 14, 1945), described as a “prophet of modern mystical Christianity”, was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science.

Biography

Brooks was born on March 22, 1861 in Louisville, Kentucky, the youngest daughter of Chauncey and Lavinia Brooks. At a fairly early age, her family moved just outside Charleston, West Virginia, where Brooks graduated from the Charleston Female Academy. Due to the collapse of her father’s salt mining business, the family moved again, this time to Pueblo, Colorado where he entered the metal mining business. He died shortly after the move, when Brooks was 19.

In 1890, with the aim of becoming a teacher, Brooks enrolled at Pueblo Normal School, which was followed by a one-year stay at Wellesley College.

In 1887, encouraged by her sister, Althea Brooks Small, Nona Brooks attended classes taught byKate Bingham, proponent of the New Thought philosophy. While attending these classes, Brooks “found herself healed of a persistent throat infection” and shortly thereafter Brooks and Small began to heal others.

Divine Science

Main article: Divine Science

In December 1898, Brooks was ordained by Malinda Cramer as a minister in the Church of Divine Science and founded the Denver Divine Science College. Shortly thereafter, she inaugurated the Divine Science Church of Denver, holding its initial service on January 1, 1899 at the Plymouth Hotel in Denver, in the process becoming the first woman pastor in Denver.

In 1902, Brooks founded Fulfillment, a Divine Science periodical. During this period, she also served on several Denver civic boards, including the Colorado State Prison Board.

After World War I Brooks succeeded her sister Fannie James as head of the college and in 1922 Brooks aligned the growing Church of Divine Science with the International New Thought Alliance.  In the early 1930s she moved to Australia, where she established several Divine Science organizations, returning to Chicago in 1935 and then back to Denver in 1938.

Nona L. Brooks died March 14, 1945 in Denver, Colorado.

Nona was described by many who knew her as warm, gentle, and “motherly”, but with “a strength that came from conviction”.

(Wikipedia.org.)

Share

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend | Love Kernels | The CW


About Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: Rebecca Bunch is a successful, driven, and possibly crazy young woman who impulsively gives up everything – her partnership at a prestigious law firm and her upscale apartment in Manhattan – in a desperate attempt to find love and happiness in that exotic hotbed of romance and adventure: suburban West Covina, CA.

Share