Leo Full Moon, Blue Moon, Supermoon, Lunar Eclipse, Jan. 31, at 5:26 am PST at 12 degrees

This Full Moon will pass through the Earth’s shadow and give us a total lunar Eclipse. The totality will last for approximately an hour and 15 minutes. The term Blue Moon just represents two Full Moons in one calendar month. It’s the first of two Blue Moons in 2018. This is also the third and last in a series of three Full Moon Supermoons. So it’s not just a total lunar eclipse, or a Blue Moon, or a supermoon. It’s all three, a super Blue Moon total lunar eclipse. This eclipse can be seen in most of western North America, northwestern South America, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, eastern Africa, eastern Europe, the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean.

The last Supermoon total lunar eclipse was in September 2015. And the last super Blue Moon total eclipse happened on December 30, 1982. And it is sometimes called a Blood Red Moon because it will be so close to the western horizon at sunrise causing it to appear red.

I have people ask me if all of the hype about this complex Full Moon makes a difference in its intensity and impact on the earth. Two of the characteristics do add to its intensity, the increased gravitational pull on the earth of a SuperMoon, and the overall impact of a Lunar Eclipse. The energies of a Supermoon are immediate contributing to bigger and stronger storms and earthquakes due to its closer proximity to the earth. The effects of the Lunar Eclipse takes a few months to fully manifest and are not immediate.

A Lunar Eclipse can create a significant shift in the Collective Consciousness. With the Moon in Leo, it represents issues of the heart. Some individuals may feel deep emotions from the past that they are ready to process for understanding, clarity and healing. Those who will feel the most energetic impact of this Full Moon are those with significant Leo and Aquarius in their natal chart. Look at your chart and find which houses are impacted.

In addition, this eclipse activates an approximate two-week period (January 31st thru February 15th)between this Lunar Eclipse and the New Moon Solar Eclipse (on February 15th) when we will have increased power for manifestation. During this 16-day period it is most important that you become aware of your thoughts and consciously focus on what you truly desire. What you create with your thoughts, positive or negative, will manifest in your world and be projected out into the world during the coming six-months.

With the Full Moon in the fixed sign of Leo, we all could enjoy being social and entertained. Leo enjoys controlling the agenda, which is often in their favor. Leo can be the big child so this is a great time to be creative and playful and to enjoy your inner child. Be cautious however, the desire to be seen and valued can express in unconscious drama. Be aware of the impact your behavior and personality has on those around you. Be loving and generous and avoid being demanding.

The Sun is in Aquarius, also a fixed sign, means aquarians cling to their ideas and beliefs. They are very independent and freedom-oriented. They tend to be friendly, independent, quirky, progressive thinkers and humanitarians by nature. They are not usually very emotional or affectionate, and are the polar opposite of the more playful Leo.

While Leo Moon energy is heart-centered, the Aquarian Sun energy is logical and intellectual, creating a push/pull sensation in our emotions and our relationships. It is helpful to balance our emotional and intellectual natures, especially if we are open and willing to listen to, and consider the opposing points-of-view. You don’t have to agree but just the act of listening could bring insight and healing to a situation.

Mercury is at 29 degrees Capricorn. The 29th degree of any sign calls for a mastery level of development and expression. It is important to be in integrity with our highest truth in our personal, professional and political dealings; to be in our integrity with our words. It urges us to strive for accuracy in our communications with others.

There are two other planets in Capricorn, Pluto and Saturn. This is a time for taking a personal inventory. Are we taking responsibility for our commitments and obligations? Are we showing up? This is the perfect time to focus on personal mastery, and to honor with integrity our thoughts, words and actions. Pluto represents the death of the old ways and the birth of the new. Saturn represents old structures and habits. Use the energy of Pluto to break up those old structures and habitual patterns and start creating the new you.

Written by Wendy Cicchetti

Full Moon symbolizes the fulfillment of the seeds planted at a previous New Moon or some earlier cycle. Each Full Moon reminds us of the seeds that may be coming to maturity, to their fullness, to fruition, to the place where the fruits or gifts are received. It may seem that fulfillment of our goals takes a long time. Some intentions may manifest within the two week phase prior to the next New or Full Moon. Some however, depending on their complexity, may take a much longer time. Just remember that our thoughts and emotions set Universal Action in motion and much work takes place behind the scenes as everything is orchestrated for fulfillment. Keep visualizing your goals as though you have already attained them and they will eventually manifest. Do not concern yourself with current conditions or worry about controlling it. The universe takes care of those details. Just keep seeing what you want, and move in that direction with your actions, and give no energy to what you don’t want. Patience is required.
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Your Horoscopes — Week Of January 30, 2018 (theonion.com)

Aquarius

Romance will bloom in your sign this week, coating everything with a thin layer of pollen and making a mess before germinating into the overripe and rotten fruit of routine.

Pisces

There will be no major changes in your life this week, which given the fires and barracudas, is pretty terrible news.

Aries

Sleep will elude you as you wrestle all night with existential questions of mortality and meaning as well as a couple of random wrestlers.

Taurus

You’ll start to think the people who want you to choose between hugs and drugs have set up a false dichotomy after discovering you can actually have both at once.

Gemini

Remember, only you can give yourself permission to be happy, although the people in charge of giving you permission to use the bathroom may have something to say about that.

Cancer

You had no idea the love life of the nuthatch was so vigorous, so obsessive, and so likely to result in the death of people like yourself who just like to watch birds do it.

Leo

You hate the phrase “We’re through the looking glass here, people,” but you’ll have to use it anyway this week when you and a bunch of people go through a looking glass.

Virgo

The stars hate to be the ones to tell you, but the problem with you is certainly not that you love too much.

Libra

People will say you’ve hit a new low even for you, which is depressing, as they clearly haven’t been paying attention to a thing you’ve done.

Scorpio

You’ll score a bunch of great stereo equipment and furniture from your neighbors, who happen to die when you go into their house and stab them and take all their things.

Sagittarius

This week will teach you that there are certain things that really can’t be faked, such as love, respect, and the human arms.

Capricorn

You knew that moving to the suburbs would expose you to a whole new kind of culture shock, but you had no idea there were people who didn’t get drunk to mow the lawn.

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Book: “Supernatural: Meetings With the Ancient Teachers of Mankind”

Supernatural: Meetings With the Ancient Teachers of Mankind

by Graham Hancock (Goodreads Author)

Less than 50,000 years ago humans had no art, no religion, no sophisticated symbolism, no innovative thinking. Then, in a dramatic change, described by scientists as ‘the greatest riddle in human history’, all the skills & qualities that we value most highly in ourselves appeared already fully formed, as tho bestowed on us by hidden powers. In Supernatural Hancock sets out to investigate this mysterious before-&-after moment & to discover the truth about the influences that gave birth to the modern mind. His quest takes him on a detective journey from the beautiful painted caves of prehistoric France, Spain & Italy to rock shelters in the mountains of S. Africa, where he finds extraordinary Stone Age art. He uncovers clues that lead him to the Amazon rainforest to drink the hallucinogen Ayahuasca with shamans, whose paintings contain images of ‘super-natural beings’ identical to the animal-human hybrids depicted in prehistoric caves. Hallucinogens such as mescaline also produce visionary encounters with exactly the same beings. Scientists at the cutting edge of consciousness research have begun to consider the possibility that such hallucinations may be real perceptions of other dimensions. Could the supernaturals 1st depicted in the painted caves be the ancient teachers of humankind? Could it be that human evolution isn’t just the meaningless process Darwin identified, but something more purposive & intelligent that we’ve barely begun to understand?
Acknowledgements
Part 1: Visions
1: Plant that enables men to see the dead
2: Greatest riddle of archeology
3: Vine of souls
Part 2: Caves
4: Therianthropy
5: Riddles of the caves
6: Shabby academy
7: Searching for a Rosetta Stone
8: Code in the mind
9: Serpents of the Drakensberg
10: Wounded healer
Part 3: Beings
11: Voyage into the supernatural
12: Shamans in the sky
13: Spirit love
14: Secret commonwealth
15: Here is a thing that will carry me away
16: Dancers between worlds
Part 4: Codes
17: Turning in to channel DMT
18: Amongst the machine elves
19: Ancient teachers in our DNA?
20: Hurricane in the junkyard
Part 5: Religions
21: Hidden Shamans
22: Flesh of the Gods
Part 6: Mysteries
23: Doors leading to another world
Appendices
Critics & criticisms of David Lewis-Williams’ Neuropsychological theory of rock & cave art
Psilocybe semilanceata-a hallucinogenic mushroom native to Europe / Roy Watlng
Interview with Rick Strassman
References
Index

(Goodreads.com)

(Submitted by Gwyllm Llwydd.)

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Movie: “When the Game Stands Tall”

2014 ‧ Drama/Sport ‧ 1h 55m

In 2003, high-school football coach Bob Ladouceur (Jim Caviezel) and his De La Salle Spartans have just completed an incredible 151 consecutive victories and 12-straight state championships. While the team’s seniors receive offers from colleges all over the country, the advancing juniors look forward to making their mark. However, beloved “Coach Lad” has a brush with calamity, while the Spartans face their most-challenging, most-unpredictable season yet.

Some of the little details that the movie gets right are nice touches, as well. De La Salle’s opponents are all real schools (even their uniforms are accurate), the Spartans have a tradition of sliding head first into the end zone after winning a championship and THE TEAM WALKS OUT FOR GAMES IN PAIRS HOLDING HANDS. 

 
Release dateAugust 22, 2014 (USA)
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Graham Hancock – The War on Consciousness BANNED TED TALK


revolutionloveevolve
Published on Mar 15, 2013

Re-uploaded as TED have decided to censor Graham and remove this video from the TEDx youtube channel. Follow this link for TED’s statement on the matter and Graham’s response: http://blog.ted.com/2013/03/14/open-f…

If anyone would like to prepare a transcript or caption file in any language so non-English speakers can enjoy this talk, please do so and I will be happy to upload it. Just PM me. Or the video is embedded on the Amara project website, so you can add subtitles there at: http://tinyurl.com/co6d39c

GRAHAM HANCOCK is the author of the major international bestsellers The Sign and The Seal, Fingerprints of the Gods, and Heaven’s Mirror. His books have sold more than five million copies worldwide and have been translated into 27 languages. His public lectures, radio and TV appearances, including two major TV series for Channel 4 in the UK and The Learning Channel in the US – Quest For The Lost Civilisation and Flooded Kingdoms of the Ice Age – have put his ideas before audiences of tens of millions. He has become recognised as an unconventional thinker who raises controversial questions about humanity’s past.

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, Hancock’s early years were spent in India, where his father worked as a surgeon. Later he went to school and university in the northern English city of Durham and graduated from Durham University in 1973 with First Class Honours in Sociology. He went on to pursue a career in quality journalism, writing for many of Britain’s leading newspapers including The Times, The Sunday Times, The Independent, and The Guardian. He was co-editor of New Internationalist magazine from 1976-1979 and East Africa correspondent of The Economist from 1981-1983.

In the early 1980’s Hancock’s writing began to move consistently in the direction of books. His first book (Journey Through Pakistan, with photographers Mohamed Amin and Duncan Willetts) was published in 1981. It was followed by Under Ethiopian Skies (1983), co-authored with Richard Pankhurst and photographed by Duncan Willets , Ethiopia: The Challenge of Hunger (1984), and AIDS: The Deadly Epidemic (1986) co-authored with Enver Carim. In 1987 Hancock began work on his widely-acclaimed critique of foreign aid, Lords of Poverty, which was published in 1989. African Ark (with photographers Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith) was published in 1990.

Hancock’s breakthrough to bestseller status came in 1992 with the publication of The Sign and The Seal, his epic investigation into the mystique and whereabouts today of the lost Ark of the Covenant. ‘Hancock has invented a new genre,’ commented The Guardian, ‘an intellectual whodunit by a do-it-yourself sleuth.’ Fingerprints of the Gods, published in 1995 confirmed Hancock’s growing reputation. Described as ‘one of the intellectual landmarks of the decade’ by the Literary Review, this book has now sold more than three million copies and continues to be in demand all around the world. Subsequent works such as Keeper Of Genesis (The Message of the Sphinx in the US) with co-author Robert Bauval, and Heaven’s Mirror, with photographer Santha Faiia, have also been Number 1 bestsellers, the latter accompanied by Hancock’s three-part television series Quest For the Lost Civilisation.

In 2002 Hancock published Underworld: Flooded Kingdoms of the Ice Age to great critical acclaim, and hosted the accompanying major TV series. This was the culmination of years of research and on-hand dives at ancient underwater ruins. Arguing that many of the clues to the origin of civilization lay underwater, on coastal regions once above water but flooded at the end of the last Ice age, Underworld offered tangible archaeological evidence that myths and legends of ancient floods were not to be dismissed out of hand.

Graham’s next venture Talisman: Sacred Cities, Secret Faith, co-authored by Robert Bauval, was published in 2004. This work, a decade in preparation, returns to the themes last dealt with in Keeper Of Genesis, seeking further evidence for the continuation of a secret astronomical cult into modern times. It is a roller-coaster intellectual journey through the back streets and rat runs of history to uncover the traces in architecture and monuments of a secret religion that has shaped the world.

In 2005 Graham published Supernatural: Meetings with The Ancient Teachers of Mankind, an investigation of shamanism and the origins of religion. This controversial book suggests that experiences in altered states of consciousness have played a fundamental role in the evolution of human culture, and that other realities – indeed parallel worlds – surround us all the time but are not normally accessible to our senses.

http://www.grahamhancock.com

These videos are released under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license, so they can be freely shared and reposted. (from http://www.ted.com/pages/about)

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On maturity

"You know, when I was in grad school, I had a professor.  He said something I still remember.

"He used to say that, for better or for worse, that maturity in modern American society had become synonymous with a lack of emotions, to not feel anything too deeply."

--Gabriel Byrne as Dr. Paul Weston in In Treatment, Season 2
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Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions

Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions
by Johann Hari

From the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, a startling challenge to our thinking about depression and anxiety.

Award-winning journalist Johann Hari suffered from depression since he was a child and started taking antidepressants when he was a teenager. He was told—like his entire generation—that his problem was caused by a chemical imbalance in his brain. As an adult, trained in the social sciences, he began to investigate this question—and he learned that almost everything we have been told about depression and anxiety is wrong.

Across the world, Hari discovered social scientists who were uncovering the real causes—and they are mostly not in our brains, but in the way we live today. Hari’s journey took him from the people living in the tunnels beneath Las Vegas, to an Amish community in Indiana, to an uprising in Berlin—all showing in vivid and dramatic detail these new insights. They lead to solutions radically different from the ones we have been offered up until now.

Just as Chasing the Scream transformed the global debate about addiction, with over twenty million views for his TED talk and the animation based on it, Lost Connections will lead us to a very different debate about depression and anxiety—one that shows how, together, we can end this epidemic.

(goodreads.com)

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Ursula K. Le Guin on “Spare Time,” What It Means to Be a Working Artist, and the Vital Difference Between Being Busy with Doing and Being Occupied with Living

By Maria Popova (brainpickings.org)

Most people are products of their time. Only the rare few are its creators. Ursula K. Le Guin (October 21, 1929–January 22, 2018) was one.

A fierce thinker and largehearted, beautiful writer who considered writing an act of falling in love, Le Guin left behind a vast, varied body of work and wisdom, stretching from her illuminations of the artist’s task and storytelling as an instrument of freedom to her advocacy for public libraries to her feminist translation of the Tao Te Chingand her classic unsexing of gender.

In her final years, Le Guin examined what makes life worth living in a splendid piece full of her wakeful, winkful wisdom, titled “In Your Spare Time” and included as the opening essay in No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters(public library) — the final nonfiction collection published in her lifetime, which also gave us Le Guin on the uses and misuses of anger.

Ursula K. Le Guin by Benjamin Reed

Two decades after her nuanced meditation on growing older, Le Guin revisits the subject from another angle, perhaps the most perspectival angle there is — the question of how we measure the light of a life as it nears its sunset. Like any great writer who finds her prompts in the most improbable of places, Le Guin springboards into the existential while answering a questionnaire mailed to the Harvard class of 1951 — alumni who, if living, would all be in their eighties. (What is it about eighty being such a catalyst for existential reflection? Henry Miller modeled it, Donald Hall followed, and Oliver Sacks set the gold standard.)

Arrested by the implications of one particular question in the survey — “In your spare time, what do you do?” — and by its menu of twenty-seven options, including golf, shopping, and bridge, Le Guin pauses over the seventh offering on the list: “Creative activities (paint, write, photograph, etc.).” She considers this disquieting valuation of creative work in a capitalist society where the practical is the primary currency of existential worth:

Here I stopped reading and sat and thought for quite a while.

The key words are spare time. What do they mean?

To a working person — supermarket checker, lawyer, highway crewman, housewife, cellist, computer repairer, teacher, waitress — spare time is the time not spent at your job or at otherwise keeping yourself alive, cooking, keeping clean, getting the car fixed, getting the kids to school. To people in the midst of life, spare time is free time, and valued as such.

But to people in their eighties? What do retired people have but “spare” time?

I am not exactly retired, because I never had a job to retire from. I still work, though not as hard as I did. I have always been and am proud to consider myself a working woman. But to the Questioners of Harvard my lifework has been a “creative activity,” a hobby, something you do to fill up spare time. Perhaps if they knew I’d made a living out of it they’d move it to a more respectable category, but I rather doubt it.

Virginia Woolf and her sister, the artist Vanessa Bell, illustrated by Nina Cosford for Virginia Woolf: An Illustrated Biography by Zena Alkayat.

A century and half after Kierkegaard extolled the creative value of unbusied hoursand ninety years after Bertrand Russell made his exquisite case for why “fruitful monotony” is essential for happiness, Le Guin examines the meanings and misconstruings of “spare” time in modern life:

The question remains: When all the time you have is spare, is free, what do you make of it?

And what’s the difference, really, between that and the time you used to have when you were fifty, or thirty, or fifteen?

Kids used to have a whole lot of spare time, middle-class kids anyhow. Outside of school and if they weren’t into a sport, most of their time was spare, and they figured out more or less successfully what to do with it. I had whole spare summers when I was a teenager. Three spare months. No stated occupation whatsoever. Much of after-school was spare time too. I read, I wrote, I hung out with Jean and Shirley and Joyce, I moseyed around having thoughts and feelings, oh lord, deep thoughts, deep feelings… I hope some kids still have time like that. The ones I know seem to be on a treadmill of programming, rushing on without pause to the next event on their schedule, the soccer practice the playdate the whatever. I hope they find interstices and wriggle into them. Sometimes I notice that a teenager in the family group is present in body — smiling, polite, apparently attentive — but absent. I think, I hope she has found an interstice, made herself some spare time, wriggled into it, and is alone there, deep down there, thinking, feeling.

Illustration by Maurice Sendak from Open House for Butterflies by Ruth Krauss.

Two millennia after Seneca placed the heart of life in learning to live wide rather than long and a century after Hermann Hesse contemplated how busyness drains life of its little, enormous joys, Le Guin examines the vital difference between being busy with doing and being occupied with living:

The opposite of spare time is, I guess, occupied time. In my case I still don’t know what spare time is because all my time is occupied. It always has been and it is now. It’s occupied by living.

An increasing part of living, at my age, is mere bodily maintenance, which is tiresome. But I cannot find anywhere in my life a time, or a kind of time, that is unoccupied. I am free, but my time is not. My time is fully and vitally occupied with sleep, with daydreaming, with doing business and writing friends and family on email, with reading, with writing poetry, with writing prose, with thinking, with forgetting, with embroidering, with cooking and eating a meal and cleaning up the kitchen, with construing Virgil, with meeting friends, with talking with my husband, with going out to shop for groceries, with walking if I can walk and traveling if we are traveling, with sitting Vipassana sometimes, with watching a movie sometimes, with doing the Eight Precious Chinese exercises when I can, with lying down for an afternoon rest with a volume of Krazy Kat to read and my own slightly crazy cat occupying the region between my upper thighs and mid-calves, where he arranges himself and goes instantly and deeply to sleep. None of this is spare time. I can’t spare it. What is Harvard thinking of? I am going to be eighty-one next week. I have no time to spare.

No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters is a wonderful read in its totality, replete with Le Guin’s warm wisdom on art and life. Complement this particular portion with German philosopher Josef Pieper on why unoccupied time is the basis of culture, English psychoanalyst Adam Phillips on why a capacity for “fertile solitude” is the basis of contentment, and two hundred years of great thinkers on the creative purpose of boredom, then revisit what I continue to consider Le Guin’s greatest nonfiction masterpiece: her brilliant essay on “being a man.”

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Expression, education, communication, community