Biography: Frederick Rawson

Frederick L. Rawson
(1859-1923)
Influential English New Thought Leader
 

 


Frederick L. Rawson was a brother to a great engineer in England. F. L. Rawson took 100 men into world war one. They all returned without a scratch on any of them. “There is nothing but God.” was his statement to that miracle. “There is nothing but God in God’s perfect world. Man is the image, the likeness, passing on God’s ideas to his fellow man with perfect regularity and ease.”

F. L. Rawson, like many other leaders in the field of New Thought, was not a clergyman. He was an engineer and businessman. Born in England in 1859, he became a distinguished practicing engineer, had achieved a marked success in his profession as consultant and as businessman, and had retired before he founded the Society for Spreading the Knowledge of True Prayer.

Among other things, he was a pioneer in the field of the practical use of electricity and engineer of the first company in the field of electric lighting. He laid the first electric railway in England. He was also interested in other things and drew up plans for the first gas-driven automobile and was consulting engineer for the first airship built in Britain. He had the respect of serious minded scientists of his day. He also excelled at various sports and was first violinist in an orchestra for more than a dozen years.

He was widely read in the fields of science and philosophy, and it was through his scientific interest in the remarkable claims made in the area of religion and the occult which led to him studying them to discover for himself whether or not the claims were true, and if they were, what scientific basis there was for them.

Christian Science had come to Britain in the late 1880’s with considerable success, and its claims of ability to heal the most stubborn of diseases could not fail to attract the attention of thoughtful people. The London Daily Mail resolved to find out the facts concerning these claims and publish them. The paper commisioned Rawson to make a study of the new cult and write a series of articles on it. Rawson accepted the assignment and began a study of Christian Science, with the result that far from exposing its errors, he was convinced of its truth and became an ardent Christian Scientist.

Eventually though, his brilliant creative mind could no longer yield itself to the rigid, authoritarian organization that Christian Science had become and he parted ways with the church and began his own work, which ultimately grew into one of the most active and influential metaphysical healing groups in England, and affiliated itself with the growing New Thought Movement.

In 1912 he wrote a book entitled Life Understood, which was to be revised and edited again and again, used as the textbook of the movement he founded, and studied far beyond the limits of his own groups of metaphysical healers the world over. He attended the first meeting of the International New Thought Alliance, held in London in 1914. Rawson was personally acquainted with another very influential English New Thought teacher, Thomas Troward.

During the first war his groups took to adopting “absent treatment” for the protection of soldiers, and some remarkable results began to appear with testimonies coming to him from persons benefited by the treatments, and in 1916 he began a weekly publication called Active Service where he published these testimonies. At the masthead of the first were the words: “A weekly paper devoted to the spreading of the knowledge of the truth. YE SHALL KNOW THE TRUTH AND THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE.”

In 1917 he set up an organization called the Society for Spreading the Knowledge of True Prayer (SSKTP); the method of prayer was to be that of the realization of and conscious communion with God. He lectured to large audiences throughout the British Isles and in 1920 made an extended tour of the USA and Canada, lecturing and giving class instruction and treatments, with the result that a goodly number of SSKTP centers were established in American and Canadian cities. Rawson was arrested in St. Louis in 1920 near the end of his tour of teaching and healing. He was charged with practicing medicine without a license and was released and the charges were dropped when he promised to do nor more healings.

Although Rawson was distinctly Christian Science in his basic outlook, he co-operated enthusiastically with the New Thought groups. Great scientist that he was, Rawson entertained a number of ideas that find no acceptance among the majority of scholars. One of these was that the British and the Americans were the true Israel–that is, he held the expounded Anglo-Israel theory, which commended itself to a good many within New Thought and the metaphysical field in general, as for example Mary Baker Eddy.

Rawson died in 1923, but the SSKTP movement went on and Active Service continued publication weekly up until August 1940 when it became a monthly, and was still in publication in the 1960’s. http://flrawson.wwwhubs.com



The following book by F.L. Rawson
is available to purchase in eBook form for immediate download. It may then be read on your computer and printed out. The eBook is in Adobe Acrobat Reader (.pdf) format.

Life Understood from a Scientific and Religious point of View

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Biography: Bishop Berkeley

BishopBerkeley
George Berkeley, known as Bishop Berkeley (March 12, 1685 – January 14, 1753), was an Anglo-Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called “immaterialism” (later referred to as “subjective idealism” by others). This theory denies the existence of material substance and instead contends that familiar objects like tables and chairs are only ideas in the minds of perceivers, and as a result cannot exist without being perceived. Berkeley is also known for his critique of abstraction, an important premise in his argument for immaterialism.  Wikipedia
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Shaman and Columbus’s Clipper Ships and Vision

This is from a story about how the native Americans could not see Columbus’s clipper ships at see because they had never seen them before. The tribe shaman was one of the first to perceive these foreign things after days of observation. And was able to convey this information to other members of the tribe. And that because the tribe members trusted him, they too began to be able to see the ships as well. I have also read that the story is that they first saw them as giant fish at see, because that was the closest thing to their reality or (visual decoded memories) that had to relate to them.

“What the Bleep do We Know?!” Quantum Edition Extra Part 1 – English subtitles:  

The unlikeliest cult hit of 2004 was What the (Bleep) Do We Know?, a lecture on mysticism and science mixed into a sort-of narrative. Marlee Matlin stars in the dramatic thread, about a sourpuss photographer who begins to question her perceptions. Interviews with quantum physics experts and New Age authors are cut into this story, offering a vaguely convincing (and certainly mind-provoking) theory about… well, actually, it sounds a lot like the Power of Positive Thinking, when you get down to it. Talking heads (not identified until film’s end) include JZ Knight, who appears in the movie channeling Ramtha, the ancient sage she claims communicates through her (other speakers are also associated with Knight’s organization). What she says actually makes pretty good common sense–Ramtha’s wiggier notions are not included–and would be easy to accept were it not being credited to a 35,000-year-old mystic from Atlantis.

Proving once and for all that life can be an amazing journey and a real trip this all-new Quantum Edition release of What The Bleep!? Down the Rabbit Hole utilizes cutting-edge DVD technology to create a unique version of the film with every viewing! The possibilities are endless…and so is the fun! Academy Award winner Marlee Matlin is Amanda, a photographer suddenly transported into a metaphysical world of quantum mechanics, odd science and mind-bending phenomena. Guided by the world’s top physicists, engineers, biologists and mystics, she tumbles down the rabbit hole and gets a first-hand look at the fascinating links between science and spirituality in our everyday lives.

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6 songs that seem romantic but aren’t, and one that seems like it isn’t but is.

50Cent

by Eric March (upworthy.com)

Love songs are where we get our passion, our soul — and most of our worst ideas.

Throughout human history, oceans have been crossed, mountains have been scaled, and great families have blossomed — all because of a few simple chords and a melody that inflamed a heart and propelled it on a noble, romantic mission.

On the other hand, that time you told that girl you just started seeing that you would “catch a grenade” for her? You did that because of a love song. And it wasn’t exactly a coincidence that she suddenly decided to “lose your number” and move back to Milwaukee to “figure some stuff out.”

That time you held that boom box over your head outside your ex’s house? You did that because of a love song. And 50 hours of community service later, you’re still not back together.

Love songs are great. They make our hearts beat faster. They inspire us to take risks and put our feelings on the line. And they give us terrible, terrible ideas about how actual, real-life human relationships should work.

They’re amazing. So amazing. And also terrible.

Here are six love songs that sound romantic but aren’t, and one song that doesn’t sound romantic but totally is:

1. “God Only Knows,” by The Beach Boys

You can keep your “Surfin’ Safaris,” your “I Get Arounds,” and your “Help me Rhondas.”

When it comes to The Beach Boys, “God Only Knows” is where it’s at. A lush garden of soft horns and breezy melody. A tie-dye swirl of sound. A landscape of haunted innocence with some of the most heartrending lyrics ever committed to the back of a surfboard.

Here’s why it sounds romantic:

I may not always love you
But long as there are stars above you
You never need to doubt it
I’ll make you so sure about it
God only knows what I’d be without you

If you’re traipsing through a meadow in a sundress with your beloved and not playing “God Only Knows” on your iPod, you should really stop and start over.

If you’re lazily bumping a beach ball over a volleyball net and “God Only Knows” isn’t playing somewhere in the back of your mind, you need to rethink the choices that got you to this point.

If you’re a video editor compiling footage of grainy hippies frolicking in the mud and you’re not underscoring it with the opening chords of “God Only Knows,” you are doing it wrong.

It’s a song that just feels like love. Pure love. Young love. Love with a chill, kelp-y vibe.

What could be wrong with that?

Here’s why it’s actually really, really unromantic:

There’s nothing wrong with loving someone. Sending them flowers. Leaving over-the-top notes in their P.O. boxes. Stroking their hair as they fall asleep while you whisper the complete works of Nicholas Sparks into their ear.

But there is such a thing as loving someone a skosh too much.

If you should ever leave me
Though life would still go on believe me
The world could show nothing to me
So what good would living do me?

Look, I get it. Breakups suck. There’s no getting around that. But good God.

There’s a huge difference between saying: “Hey babe, you are my first and foremost everything and I’ll be bummed if you go.” And saying: “Welp, you accepted that job in Seattle, so I’m just gonna chug a bunch of nightshade and call it a life.”

But that’s pretty much the gist here. Which makes this line…

God only knows what I’d be without you

…horror-movie creepy. Because the answer, apparently, is: “I’d be a corpse!”

That’s not love. That’s codependency (to put it mildly). Oh, and hey! Threatening to kill yourself if your partner leaves isn’t loving. It’s a form of emotional abuse.

Investing all your happiness and sense of self-worth in any relationship — one that, by definition, might one day end — is putting a lot of eggs in one basket. Sure, God may only know what you’d be without her, but God probably also hopes you have, I don’t know, some hobbies. Take a yoga class. Google some woodworking videos. Try kite surfing.

One person cannot be anyone’s be-all and end-all. It’s too stressful. And it prevents you from doing you, which is a thing that’s gotta be done before you can do anything else.

No wonder she took that job in Seattle.

2. “Treasure,” by Bruno Mars

Sure, it’s a blatant rip off of every Michael Jackson song you’ve ever heard. But, we don’t have Michael Jackson anymore, and as tribute acts go, you could do a lot worse than Bruno Mars.

Here’s why the song sounds romantic:

Treasure, that is what you are
Honey, you’re my golden star
You know you can make my wish come true
If you let me treasure you
If you let me treasure you

Pass those lyrics to anyone on a used napkin at an eighth-grade make-out party and you’ll likely get an instant toll pass on the highway to tongue-town (ew).

Pass them to your spouse and, chances are, date night is going to culminate in 47 minutes of chaste-yet-passionate frenching.

Pass them to a cop who pulls you over for running a stop sign, and they will think you’re weird — but probably still make out with you.

In fact, Bruno Mars basically has a lifetime pass to make out with America because of this song.

And I’m OK with that.

But, here’s why “Treasure” isn’t as romantic as it seems:

Everything about “Treasure” is retro. Everything.

Including its attitudes about gender.

Things start to go south right from the very beginning:

Give me your, give me your, give me your attention, baby
I gotta tell you a little something about yourself

Ah yes. Nothing screams “respect” quite like a man lecturing a strange woman on the street about something she “doesn’t know about herself.”

What could it be? Could it be that her jokes are funny? Could it be that she’s got something in her teeth? Could it be that her nonfiction book about early modern German history is extremely detailed and informative?

Spoiler Alert: It’s none of those.

You’re wonderful, flawless, ooh, you’re a sexy lady
But you walk around here like you wanna be someone else

Oh. It’s that she’s sexy. Cool, bro. Very original.

Word of advice? Regardless of how she’s walking, the lady knows she’s sexy. Even if she doesn’t, it really doesn’t affect her day-to-day so much that you, a complete stranger, need to shout it at her (even over a funky disco snare).

So what if she does want to be someone else? I’d love to be someone else! I think being Ryan Gosling would be quite nice. A good way to spend a three-day weekend.

And then later, of course, the narrator can’t help himself:

Pretty girl, pretty girl, pretty girl, you should be smiling
A girl like you should never look so blue.

He respects her so much, he’s actually straight-up telling her to smile! Much like Mars’ character “Uptown Funk,” who appears to get off on angrily exhorting girls to “hit [their] hallelujah.” Which, you know, I guess everybody’s got a thing.

Yes, in the world of “Treasure,” a healthy relationship is an unending stream of a man complimenting a strange woman and said woman being so totally flattered that she immediately dispenses “the sex.”

He then proceeds to talk to his potential lover like the world’s creepiest pirate:

You are my treasure, you are my treasure
You are my treasure, yeah, you, you, you, you are
You are my treasure, you are my treasure
You are my treasure, yeah, you, you, you, you are

By this point, in his mind, she’s a literal thing. An object. Which is fitting.

I suppose it could be worse, though. At least she’s not just any thing.

That’s … something, right?

3. “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right,” by Bob Dylan

For as long as humans have been dating each other, humans have been breaking up with each other. And “Don’t Think Twice” is a portrait of a relationship going down in flames. Glorious, poetic, acoustic flames.

Here’s why it sounds romantic:

Well, it ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
Even you don’t know by now
And it ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
It’ll never do somehow
When your rooster crows at the break of dawn
Look out your window, and I’ll be gone
You’re the reason I’m a-traveling on
But don’t think twice, it’s all right.

Boom. Strummed on out of that friends-with-benefits situation like whoa.

“Don’t Think Twice” is a raw song. An honest song. A powerful song. It’s the song your older sister played on continuous loop for six months after her boyfriend left for college. The song that convinced your Aunt Roslyn to leave her bank-teller job, load her four Australian shepherds into the van, and open a wind chime store in Mendocino. The song your friend’s cool dad always wants to play when he invited your high school band over to his apartment to jam.

Sure, it’s about the end of a relationship, but it sounds romantic. And at the end of the day, shouldn’t that be enough?

Here’s why it’s actually sooooo messed up:

Relationships end. For a lot of reasons. And while there is no right way to call it quits with someone, when the dust settles, both parties can certainly benefit from a difficult, honest discussion about what went wrong.

In “Don’t Think Twice,” that discussion basically boils down to: “It’s your fault.”

Let’s review the reasons the dude in “Don’t Think Twice” is splitting with his lady friend:

I gave her my heart, but she wanted my soul

Ugh, women, right? You’re all like, “Babe, I just have so much unspecified love to give,” and she’s like, “Take out the trash!” And you’re like, “But baaaaaaabe, shouldn’t my heart be enough?” And she’s like, “No, seriously. I already did the laundry, cleaned the whole house, fed the dog, did the dishes, and made both of our lunches for the week. All I need you to do is take out the trash.” And you’re like, “You’re bumming me out. I’m gonna go play guitar.” And then she gets all mad! What did you do? Why is she trying to change you? UGH!

You could have done better, but I don’t mind

Yes. You do mind! You mind! You wrote a song about it, you passive-aggressive prick.

You just kinda wasted my precious time

Ah yes. Your time is so precious! Think about all the hours you wasted plumbing the ocean-deep, ecstatic mysteries of human partnership when you could have been futzing around with that home-brew kit.

The minute you start breaking it down, the message of “Don’t Think Twice” suddenly starts to seem a lot less romantic. Like your sister’s ex-boyfriend, who worked at the Bass Pro Shop in town for a while and now might be in jail. Like your aunt’s wind chime store, which would have closed forever ago had she not received that inheritance from her mom in the ’80s. Like your friend’s cool dad, who wasn’t exactly, technically, paying child support.

Oh yeah, and the song’s narrator also point-blank refers woman he’s leaving as:

A child, I’m told

That’s right. In addition to being a run-of-the-mill passive-aggressive jerk — turns out, he’s also possibly a pedophile.

Even if we are to accept that this is a metaphor and she’s not actually a child — which there’s no indication it is, but OK, Bob Dylan — the fact that Commitmentphobe Gunderson here would willingly choose an immature partner reflects way more poorly on him than it does on her.

Breaking up with anyone in such a cruel, dismissive way is a recipe for sticking them with years of therapy bills.

Which, I suppose, may be the point.

Continue reading 6 songs that seem romantic but aren’t, and one that seems like it isn’t but is.

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Julia Galef: Why you think you’re right – even if you’re wrong | TED Talk


Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs — or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: “What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?

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The first step of RHS

Sometimes I see things on TV or read about things in the news about the horrific childhoods some people have endured and I ask myself how I would or could ever possibly RHS a situation such as that.

For students of Releasing the Hidden Splendour (RHS), there’s also a first step, just like there is in a Translation.  [For a brief summary of these classes, see the “Mentors and Classes” tab on this site.]  A Translation begins with the first step statement of being so that we begin a Translation, not as some woe-begotten schmuck, but as an expression of Infinite Mind, whole, complete and perfect in every respect.

It’s important to begin an RHS this way as well because it immediately puts the lie to whatever claim we may believe about who did what do whom.  If we start out an RHS on the basis of wholeness already arrived, then we can undermine much more easily the claims of our inner child of the past when it gets to the point where we need to do that.

We still have to proceed with the accusation, of course, but identifying at the outset wth our ontological reality begs the question:  How did an expression of Infinite Mine get caught up in this nonsense in the first place?  Is Infinite Mind subject to poor parenting?  Does Infinite Mind feel under-appreciated, abused or spoiled?  Probably not.

The accusation then becomes the psychodrama it needs to be, with the emphasis on drama.  And just like with any drama, we eventually arrive at a denouement, which is to say we end up where we started from, with the realization that our real identity is as an expression of Infinite Mind and certainly not some character caught up in some drama which is anything but whole, complete and perfect.

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Louise Hay: You Can Heal Your Life: The Movie


This entertaining and inspirational movie based on the best-selling book of the same name is hosted by author and teacher Louise L. Hay. This film gives penetrating insights into Louise’s fascinating personal story; and shows how her views on self-esteem, abundance, and the metaphysical causes behind physical ailments were developed. It also reveals how she applied these concepts to her own emotional, spiritual, and professional life.

A number of luminaries in the fields of self-help, philosophy, health, spirituality, and New Thought join Louise, giving their take on success, happiness, and the myriad ways in which people can heal their own lives. And there are also gripping firsthand accounts from others who have been positively affected by Louise’s work.

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